interdict

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interdict

(ĭn`tərdĭkt), ecclesiastical censure notably used in the Roman Catholic Church, especially in the Middle Ages. When a parish, state, or nation is placed under the interdict no public church ceremony may take place, only certain sacraments, especially baptism, may be administered, and the dead may not receive Christian burial. The interdict is used to sway public opinion and to force action. A famous example was the interdict placed upon England during the reign of King JohnJohn,
1167–1216, king of England (1199–1216), son of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Early Life

The king's youngest son, John was left out of Henry's original division of territory among his sons and was nicknamed John Lackland.
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 by Innocent IIIInnocent III,
b. 1160 or 1161, d. 1216, pope (1198–1216), an Italian, b. Anagni, named Lotario di Segni; successor of Celestine III. Innocent III was succeeded by Honorius III.
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 in 1208.

Interdict

 

a form of ecclesiastical pressure or punishment in the Catholic Church; a temporary ban placed by the pope (or sometimes by a bishop) on worship and religious ceremonies (excluding excommunication from the church) within a particular area (a local interdict). Sometimes it is placed on particular people and is known as a personal interdict. It was used widely in the 11th and 12th centuries (less frequently beginning with the 13th century) and was a powerful weapon in exerting pressure on sovereigns and feudal lords and in the war against heresy.lt has lost its former significance but still remains part of canon law.

interdict

1. RC Church the exclusion of a person or all persons in a particular place from certain sacraments and other benefits, although not from communion
2. Civil law any order made by a court or official prohibiting an act
3. Scots law an order having the effect of an injunction
4. Roman history
a. an order of a praetor commanding or forbidding an act
b. the procedure by which this order was sought
References in periodicals archive ?
Cuba's intensive security presence and interdiction efforts have kept supply down and prevented traffickers from establishing a foothold.
The responsibility for the interdiction operations mission has traditionally been assigned to the U.
Since PSI'S launch, only a handful of interdictions a year have become part of the public record.
Second, the PSI provides participating countries with opportunities to improve national capabilities and authorities to conduct interdictions.
The drop in interdictions, however, does not reflect the change of leadership in Cuba, where an ailing Fidel Castro temporarily turned over power to brother Raul in July.
This was a difficult--and, as it turned out, frustrating--tacit admission by the United States that it needs a UN mandate to legitimize high-seas PSI interdictions.
The Coast Guard's Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) Jacksonville, Fla.
Interdiction policies highlight tensions in the current relationship between the liberal democratic asylee-receiving state, the international human rights regime, and the realities facing the asylum seeker.
Security Council,'' Assistant Defense Secretary Peter Rodman said of the proposed interdiction during congressional testimony.
Commanders whose districts register abnormally low interdiction rates while maintaining normal to high daytime burglary rates may be called on to explain the dearth of interdictions in their districts.
Drug-war boosters point to 219 air interdictions in the Caribbean in the past three years, but meanwhile drug traffickers have shifted to using passenger planes that land, undetected, in Mexico and transfer the goods by truck.
Nearly all of these interdictions involved some type of foreign partner support or cooperation, through direct unit participation, exercise of bilateral agreements, granting permission to board, or logistics support.