interesting

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interesting

In hacker parlance, this word has strong connotations of "annoying", or "difficult", or both. Hackers relish a challenge, and enjoy wringing all the irony possible out of the ancient Chinese curse "May you live in interesting times".
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, 61 per cent of people who said they were of a non-Christian faith and 52 per cent of no religious faith, supported the schools.
Interestingly, analysts have found that the flows of money are counter-cyclical, that is, when the economy weakens, remittances increase.
Interestingly, where the planes align there is a conspicuous break in surface that looks like an incision and stands out with a curious stridency, as though existing independently of the bleak atmosphere surrounding it.
Interestingly, he referred to the EU--rather than any of its constituent nations--as "a strong partner" in the trans-Atlantic alliance with the United States.
Interestingly, the problem appears to be greatest in community colleges, which are currently being inundated with new students across the country.
Interestingly, China becomes the chair effective January 1.
There were no lawsuits filed by the men, interestingly enough.
Interestingly, bared limbs were not necessarily as virtuous as bared breasts; over the centuries, the body has been sexualized and desexualized in many different ways.
Interestingly, the genetic basis for PIA production is present in an increasing number of microorganisms, including such pathogenic species as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.
Interestingly enough, a similar change was subsequently adopted into the AICPA Governance report.
Interestingly, each of these financial planners talked to me about joining their company and helping me get the necessary education and credentials to function as a Certified Financial Planner Practitioner.
Interestingly, the effect of being overweight was about twice as high in nonallergic children as in children with documented allergies (the authors note, however, that this difference may be due in part to an underreporting of allergy).