interfacial layer

interfacial layer

[‚in·tər¦fā·shəl ′lā·ər]
(physical chemistry)
A one- or two-molecules-thick boundary between any two bulk phases (gas, liquid, or solid) in contact where the properties differ from the properties of the bulk phases.
References in periodicals archive ?
After doing the microcosmic and spectral experiments, Dealy [44] and Denn [45] believed that the dividing line should not be absolutely clear between the adsorption-desorption slip and the entanglement-disentanglement slip because the slippage occurred not only at the wall, but also at the interfacial layer close to the bulk polymer melt.
The functional performance of these systems can be controlled by engineering the composition and structure of the interfacial layer coating the lipid droplets.
The interfacial layer of ABC will allow the control of the emulsion functionality without using high concentration of emulsifiers which are generally used to stabilize emulsions.
These substrates bring diamond to within less than a micron of the gate junction by growing the diamond on a 30-nm-thick interfacial layer at the GaN buffer.
Similar to the chloroplasts in green plants that carry out photosynthesis, our artificial photosynthetic system is composed of two semiconductor light absorbers, an interfacial layer for charge transport, and spatially separated co-catalysts," explained Peidong Yang, a chemist with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division, who led this research.
Interestingly, some nanoparticles are observed to be surrounded by an interfacial layer in darker phase (see inset in Fig.
A comparison of experimental stable cases and exact solutions revealed the existence of a thin interfacial layer that smoothes out the discontinuity of the velocity gradient at the interface.
While none of the tested coatings fulfilled all the requirements, Davis found that magnesium reacts with the moisture released by the sodium silicate binder and the silica and oxygen to produce magnesium oxide which reacts with the silica in the binder to form an interfacial layer of magnesium silicate.
This 10-to 50-nanometer-thick interfacial layer, they argue, is largely responsible for the 'material's high efficiency and possibly its stability.
16), indicating a direct participation in the interfacial layer formed on the wire.
However, if sufficient air is trapped and coalesced within the interfacial layer it can result in the local average specific gravity falling below that of the upper organic layer.