interfirm network


Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

interfirm network

A group of related organizations that partner and/or cooperate with each other in order to provide expanded products and services. The Japanese "Keiretsu" is perhaps the best example of an interfirm network. See Keiretsu.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Interfirm networks are altering the competitive landscape (Parkhe, Wasserman, & Ralston, 2006).
Gulati, 1995; Pisano, 1989), research into the organization of interfirm networks has been scant.
However, his study involves a major manufacturer surrounded by an interfirm network (e.
Therefore, this study employs the network perspective to examine whether social networks are valuable and particularly focuses on interfirm networks.
Each locus involves overlapping interfirm networks and helps us visualize how a nexus supplier can be embedded in the network.
The proposed rule had a definition of an accounting firm "affiliate" that would have prohibited virtually any business association or relationship, including interfirm networks.
The existence of parallel structures in the informal and interfirm networks that "got the job done" under socialism means that instead of an institutional vacuum we find routines and practices, organizational forms and social ties, that can become assets, resources, and the basis for .
When a label such as "virtual corporation" is used to describe interfirm networks or "business ecosystem" is applied to networks that include not only companies but also universities, government agencies, and other actors, one can appreciate how amorphous the object of policy has become.
Local linkages and interfirm networks did seem to offer firms regional competitive advantages in three important areas.
In a recent review of literature on the role of interfirm networks in innovation (Ozman, 2008), this aspect has been identified as an important gap in the current literature.
Because economic action is inevitably embedded in social structure (Granovetter 1985), this notion of embeddedness reveals the significant role of social relations in economic and management activities and has stimulated studies of interfirm networks (Uzzi 1997), marketing channels (Moorman/Zaltman/Deshpande 1992), location decisions (Romo/Schwartz 1995), organizational adaptation (Baum/Oliver 1991), and ethnic economies (Waldinger/Aldrich/Ward 1990).
The need to deliver goods and components on a just-in-time basis favors the emergence of local networks of firms, and many scholars have associated the Japanese automobile industry's increasing shares in international markets with its industrial organization based on local interfirm networks.