interjection


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interjection

An interjection, also known as an exclamation, is a word, phrase, or sound used to convey an emotion such as surprise, excitement, happiness, or anger. Interjections are very common in spoken English, but they appear in written English as well. Capable of standing alone, they are grammatically unrelated to any other part of a sentence.
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interjection,

English part of speechpart of speech,
in traditional English grammar, any one of about eight major classes of words, based on the parts of speech of ancient Greek and Latin. The parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, interjection, preposition, conjunction, and pronoun.
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 consisting of exclamatory words such as oh, alas, and ouch. They are marked by a feature of intonation that is usually shown in writing by an exclamation point (see punctuationpunctuation
[Lat.,=point], the use of special signs in writing to clarify how words are used; the term also refers to the signs themselves. In every language, besides the sounds of the words that are strung together there are other features, such as tone, accent, and pauses,
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). Many languages have classes like interjections.

Interjection

 

a part of speech that includes invariable words which are usually not morphologically divisible and which appear in speech as one-unit sentences. Interjections fulfill an expressive or hortatory function, expressing, for example, the speaker’s feelings (Oh!; Oho!), a call (Hey!; Chick-chick!), or an order (Shoo!). They can be expressed by sounds and sound clusters that are not typical for a given language, for example, the labial trilled resonant (tpru!, “Whoa!”) or the combination [d‘z’] (dzin’-dzin\ “dingdong”).

References in classic literature ?
Giry's three teeth were clashing in a noisy contest, full of hideous interjections.
Our bashful fears, our silent interjections, our blushes, as we met each other's eyes, were expressive with an eloquence, a boyish charm, which I have ceased to feel.
Our imagination was kept at its height, interjections followed quickly on each other.
Irwine answered, in the deep half-masculine tone which belongs to the vigorous old woman, and there entered a young gentleman in a riding-dress, with his right arm in a sling; whereupon followed that pleasant confusion of laughing interjections, and hand-shakings, and "How are you's?
Dairyman Crick's stories often seemed to be ended when they were not really so, and strangers were betrayed into premature interjections of finality; though old friends knew better.
Kennedy had, at length, become as talkative as Joe, and the two kept up a continual interchange of admiring interjections and exclamations.
But neither here nor elsewhere do I pretend to give his exact words; his vocabulary was small, and he had no gift for framing sentences, so that one had to piece his meaning together out of interjections, the expression of his face, gestures and hackneyed phrases.
A reflection of a night that seemed to be more about entertainment than serious artistry, his interjections and asides to the audience succeeded in cajoling attendees into abandoning their seats to stand up and clap along.
Real conversation is filled with starts and stops, interruptions, interjections, and, urn, well, other words such as F-bombs, N-words, sexual references, and the like, which mostly don't work as TV dialogue.
What interjection used in hymns and liturgies means, in Hebrew, praise the Lord?
This is with reference to the article published on the front page (GDN, July 12) regarding the accident that took place at the interjection of Janabiya Road and the entrance to Bani Jamra village.
This is a much more serious drawback than the interjection of references to theory and quotations from academic feminist texts.