interjection

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interjection

An interjection, also known as an exclamation, is a word, phrase, or sound used to convey an emotion such as surprise, excitement, happiness, or anger. Interjections are very common in spoken English, but they appear in written English as well. Capable of standing alone, they are grammatically unrelated to any other part of a sentence.
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interjection,

English part of speechpart of speech,
in traditional English grammar, any one of about eight major classes of words, based on the parts of speech of ancient Greek and Latin. The parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, interjection, preposition, conjunction, and pronoun.
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 consisting of exclamatory words such as oh, alas, and ouch. They are marked by a feature of intonation that is usually shown in writing by an exclamation point (see punctuationpunctuation
[Lat.,=point], the use of special signs in writing to clarify how words are used; the term also refers to the signs themselves. In every language, besides the sounds of the words that are strung together there are other features, such as tone, accent, and pauses,
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). Many languages have classes like interjections.

Interjection

 

a part of speech that includes invariable words which are usually not morphologically divisible and which appear in speech as one-unit sentences. Interjections fulfill an expressive or hortatory function, expressing, for example, the speaker’s feelings (Oh!; Oho!), a call (Hey!; Chick-chick!), or an order (Shoo!). They can be expressed by sounds and sound clusters that are not typical for a given language, for example, the labial trilled resonant (tpru!, “Whoa!”) or the combination [d‘z’] (dzin’-dzin\ “dingdong”).

References in classic literature ?
Still another, and he interested Philip because his uncouth manner and interjectional speech did not suggest that he was capable of any deep emotion, had felt himself stifle among the houses of London.
Fitchett laughing and shaking her head slowly, with an interjectional "Sure
Having arrived at this comfortable frame of mind (to which she had been greatly assisted by certain short interjectional remarks of the philosophical George), Mrs Jarley consoled Nell with many kind words, and requested as a personal favour that whenever she thought of Miss Monflathers, she would do nothing else but laugh at her, all the days of her life.