interjection

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interjection

An interjection, also known as an exclamation, is a word, phrase, or sound used to convey an emotion such as surprise, excitement, happiness, or anger. Interjections are very common in spoken English, but they appear in written English as well. Capable of standing alone, they are grammatically unrelated to any other part of a sentence.
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interjection,

English part of speechpart of speech,
in traditional English grammar, any one of about eight major classes of words, based on the parts of speech of ancient Greek and Latin. The parts of speech are noun, verb, adjective, adverb, interjection, preposition, conjunction, and pronoun.
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 consisting of exclamatory words such as oh, alas, and ouch. They are marked by a feature of intonation that is usually shown in writing by an exclamation point (see punctuationpunctuation
[Lat.,=point], the use of special signs in writing to clarify how words are used; the term also refers to the signs themselves. In every language, besides the sounds of the words that are strung together there are other features, such as tone, accent, and pauses,
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). Many languages have classes like interjections.

Interjection

 

a part of speech that includes invariable words which are usually not morphologically divisible and which appear in speech as one-unit sentences. Interjections fulfill an expressive or hortatory function, expressing, for example, the speaker’s feelings (Oh!; Oho!), a call (Hey!; Chick-chick!), or an order (Shoo!). They can be expressed by sounds and sound clusters that are not typical for a given language, for example, the labial trilled resonant (tpru!, “Whoa!”) or the combination [d‘z’] (dzin’-dzin\ “dingdong”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Occasionally he halted and looking the wind full in the face drew in a great breath, declaring as he puffed it out with an interjectory laugh, "This is fine; this is the way a soldier should live; plenty of exercise and plenty of wholesome air will keep him well always.
The recurring dreamlike image of a symbolic, mythical swan is interwoven with the story line, as are many interjectory passages from a variety of sources.
Concentrating on Davidson's view of metaphor, we can see some connections with musical silence develop, beginning with the idea that explaining silence as metaphor grants it the interjectory quality which Rorty describes.