interlude


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interlude,

development in the late 15th cent. of the English medieval morality play. Played between the acts of a long play, the interlude, treating intellectual rather than moral topics, often contained elements of satire or farce. The form developed in Italy as the intermedio and intermezzointermezzo
. 1 Any theatrical entertainment of a light nature performed between the divisions of a longer, more serious work. 2 In the 17th and 18th cent., a short independent comic scene with everyday characters was interpolated between acts of serious operas.
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, in France as the entremet or intermede and as the entrée, which involved only dance. In Spain the entremés became an independent form as in the work of Cervantes.

Bibliography

See E. K. Chambers, The Medieval Stage (1903); V. F. Hopper and G. B. Lahey, ed., Medieval Mysteries, Moralities and Interludes (1962).

Interlude

 

(1) A short musical or connecting piece played between the two main parts of a work: between acts in an opera or a play (more frequently known as an intermedium or intermezzo), between stanzas in a hymn (improvised on the organ), or between movements in a long musical piece such as a sonata or a suite.

(2) A type of drama popular in England in the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance. Initially a short stage play performed during festivals, the interlude (or intermedium) was one of the transitional forms between the morality play and the farce. In the early 16th century it became a vehicle of anticlerical satire in the works of J. Rastell and particularly of J. Heywood.

interlude

[′in·tər‚lüd]
(computer science)
A small routine or program which is designed to carry out minor preliminary calculations or housekeeping operations before the main routine begins to operate, and which can usually be overwritten after it has performed its function.

interlude

1. Theatre a short dramatic piece played separately or as part of a longer entertainment, common in 16th-century England
2. a brief piece of music, dance, etc., given between the sections of another performance
References in periodicals archive ?
In the third interlude, as the light of the sun enters the house, the furnishings appear to meld into one another so that they are both "separate" and "inextricably involved" (75).
Interlude with Danger Devils fire display team (15 mins).
Interlude has taken found objects and turned them into decorative accessories with success.
This year's Winter Interlude was no exception, as more than 175 attendees gathered to enjoy the festivities and honor members who have given so much to the industry and the organization.
Beginning with the "Walk to the Paradise Garden" interlude from Delius's fin-desiecle opera A Village Romeo and Juliet (1901--the date of the first performance is given), Morris proceeds in chapter 2 (rather coyly subtitled "What the Conductor Saw"--the preceding Delius chapter is dubbed "A Walk on the Wild Side") to present a detailed and convincing reading of the explicit sexual ideology inherent in love scenes in orchestral interludes from act 2 of Massenet's Esclarmonde (1889) and Strauss's crudely satirical single-act Feuersnot (1901).
Comparison suggests that it was based on the 1612 Parte text; its publication in Lisbon in 1647 testifies to the enduring popularity of the interlude.
In addition to the mystery of Jens's missing interludes, Jorgensen explores the making of a rather far-ranging documentary on the eerie, quixotic residents of Sem and on village life and activities.
Interlude makes most appeal in a trappy Rothmans Royals Park Hill Stakes (3.
Robinson took his horse wide of all the others up the Haydock straight and enjoyed a trouble-free run while favourite Interlude hit trouble for the second time in as many starts.
Rome--(Zenit) The European Synod, meeting for the second time after an eight-year interlude, will concentrate on Eastern Europe and on the practical atheism and hedonism which now dominate the European Union.
Counter clockwise from top: Alpine horns at the Swiss National Day celebration; tap dancers mark the opening of the outdoor stage; the Junior Round Table, part of the Caux industrial conferences, takes a break; Filipino dancers; Ryuzaburo Kaku, Chairman of Canon, puts one of his latest cameras to use; balancing act; a musical interlude
In the musical interlude where this challenge is composed and articulated, the women exchange "a curious compound play of identity and difference," wherein Djamilaa gains a namesake negative dialectic and a nominal near-identity with Aunt Nancy: "no longer exactly Djamilaa .