intermetallic alloys

intermetallic alloys

[‚in·tər·mə‚tal·ik ′a‚lȯis]
(metallurgy)
Ordered alloys having a superlattice crystal structure. Unlike conventional alloys, they have a strong chemical arrangement that reduces the mobility of atoms and results in good structural stability, higher melting temperatures, and lower densities. However, most are brittle due to their complex crystal structure, resulting in poor fracture resistance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mantle, The machining of [gamma]-TiAl intermetallic alloys, CIRP Annals-Manufacturing Technology 54 (2005) 99-104.
Contributed by scientists from Europe, Asia, and the US, the 30 chapters explain the surface properties of alloys, the properties of surface alloys, surfaces of compound semiconductors, the physical properties of surface silicides, the properties of oxide surfaces, and surfaces of simple ionic crystals, ice, quasicrystals and related intermetallic alloys, and amorphous/glassy materials.
Researchers at Los Alamos (NM) National Laboratory, for example, have developed a SiC-reinforced molybdenum disilicide intermetallic that, at temperatures greater than 1200 C, is 15 times stronger than current intermetallic alloys.