Interpenetrate

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Interpenetrate

A decorative feature, such as a molding, that enters another element, such as a column, and reappears on the other side; it was commonly found in the Gothic Revival style.
References in periodicals archive ?
From (22), the interpenetration velocity [delta] at the restitution period can be obtained:
4 of the final interpenetration length we can see that it is only changed by the chains' parameters.
One photograph--illustrating the interpenetration of cultures--is of a group working together on the BBC Eastern Service in 1944.
Interpenetration is possible because of the evolutionary achievement of developing human language (Luhmann, 1995a, p.
Yet several essays point out earlier evidence of clerical participation, a more pervasive presence of theological reflection on marriage, and greater interpenetration of secular and ecclesiastical views of marriage than we have been accustomed to expect.
The interpenetration of the poetic and the theological motivates his primary analysis.
Reflecting the increased interpenetration of world markets, international and foreign trade activities are projected to continue their current fast-growing trend over the projection period.
In "Choking," Barton has opted to keep this interpenetration to a minimum, and the result seems a trade-off.
So nuclear future strike, which I believe is implausible, will be a threat to the Palestinian society as well because of the interpenetration of both societies and the geographic overlapping of the two communities.
Readers benefit from precise, emblematic accommodations of Frye's thinking because it can be an expanding network of association, reiteration, and even interpenetration, a key term in Frye's religious vocabulary.
is an ambitious study of the interpenetration between literary modernism and mass culture.
The analogical imagination images the world as an interpenetration between the finite particular and the ideal essence (Father Lynch's analysis owes much to the Platonic notion of participation).