interpret

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interpret

[in′tər·prət]
(computer science)
To print on a punched card the information punched in that card.

interpret

To run a program one line at a time. Each line of source language is translated into machine language and then executed.
References in classic literature ?
And together in divine confidence they would disentangle and interpret them all.
And there sat I, powerless to interpret, and so power-less to help!
The magician was delighted to find that his search had been successful, and at once set to work to interpret the secret signs engraved upon the ring, but it took him seven weeks to make them out clearly.
3 : to bring out the meaning of <An actor interprets a role.
In other words, interpreting is done only when the speaker completes each intelligible chunk of the speech or the entire speech and stops; the interpreter then takes over and interprets the chunk or the entire speech without any interruption from the speaker.
For those who may not be aware, the Haydock Commentary on the Douay-Rheims Bible interprets this passage as follows: "the abolishing of the Mass as much as possible, and the practice of heresy and abomination, unto the end of antichrist's persecution .
Unlike many other sensor systems which capture specific pressures within specific ranges at given moments in time (almost like taking a Polaroid), CTPSS records and interprets contact force in real time.
Throughout she analyzes and interprets both well-known authors like Jonathan Swift, Daniel Defoe, and Alexander Pope, and more obscure writers including Aphra Behn, Delariviere Manley, and Bonnell Thornton.
Pincus finds diverse sources and meanings for other motifs on the tomb and interprets the use of different styles as a deliberate effort to extend references "beyond Byzantium to other parts of the late medieval world" (28).
In each of these examples, Weimer interprets events by capturing spontaneous natural gestures, linking them to evocative body language, and thereby expressing basic human values that all of us understand.
Like versions of the African deity Legba, who interprets the workings of the cosmos to human beings, Consolata and Lone interpret and learn in intuitive, holistic, and open-ended ways, ways that provide a deeper understanding than do Patricia's charts and notes, and ways that jibe with the implications of Morrison's own rhetoric.
WHILE FINKELSTEIN AND SILBERMAN ARE CONCERNED with how the Bible interprets history, Harvard biblical scholar James Kugel wants us to look at the ways Jews and Christians have interpreted (and reinterpreted) the Bible.

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