interregnum


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interregnum

1. an interval between two reigns, governments, incumbencies, etc.
2. any period in which a state lacks a ruler, government, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interregnum will eventually end and a new order will be born.
Although it veers too far into counterfactual history on occasion, this book, and the research grounding it, will benefit future studies of military, local, and political histories of the Interregnum.
Appreciating the importance of the parish in understanding the aftermath of the English Civil War and Interregnum is usually stymied by a lack of local records.
Following the service, churchwarden John Dean presented a book token to the Revs John and Jenny Barnes in recognition of their contribution in ensuring continuity of services at St Mary's Church during the period of a 15-month interregnum.
The author also pays thorough attention to the extensive use made of Spanish dramatic sources and geographical and historical settings in the Interregnum and Restoration dramas (Chapters 3 and 4).
Fukuyama was mistaken to associate this interregnum with the Hegelian (or I suppose Kojevian) "end of history.
The author's location of Casaubon at the center of interregnum language reform represents an interesting hypothesis in its own right (146-48).
We are resuming our contact after interregnum of some time.
Hobbes formed his views within a specific context, in his case the Civil Wars, the judicial murder of the King, the Interregnum of 1649-1660, and the Restoration.
The new commission now appears increasingly likely to win parliament's endorsement in a vote next Tuesday in Strasbourg, ending an interregnum that has continued since the mandate of the outgoing executive expired last October.
After all, Reformed Protestantism was supposed to have been discredited by the Civil Wars and Interregnum, by the Puritan Revolution, and while the Reformed faith might survive among some of the Dissenting churchmen, the Reformed divinity and its adherents were supposed to have been purged from the restored episcopalian church by the Act of Uniformity in 1662.
Lord Mandelson's return from his own break on the Greek island of Corfu, finally brought an end to a three-day interregnum in which no senior minister was apparently in charge in London.