interrogator


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interrogator

[in′ter·ə‚gād·ər]
(electronics)
A radar transmitter which sends out a pulse that triggers a transponder; usually combined in a single unit with a responsor, which receives the reply from a transponder and produces an output suitable for actuating a display of some navigational parameter. Also known as challenger; interrogator-transmitter.

interrogator

i. A radar set or other electronic device that transmits an interrogation. Normally, ground-based surveillance radar beacon transmitter-receiver scanning in synchronism with primary radar continuously transmitted signals requesting replies from all cooperative airborne transponders. The received signals are mixed with the primary radar return and displayed on the same plan position indicator (PPI).
ii. An electronic device for transmitting challenging or interrogating pulses for reception and response by a transponder.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to directly employing cruel, inhuman and degrading means, Israeli interrogation authorities indirectly participate in torture by knowingly using information obtained through use of torture -- usually severe -- by Palestinian Authority interrogators against the self-same detainees.
Since interrogation often provides the essential elements of information in asymmetrical-warfare analysis, perhaps the time has come to end the debate and ask the question, "How is the military intelligence (MI) community preparing and supporting its interrogators for the future?
We think he ended up dying," Khadr quoted the interrogators as telling him shortly after he was captured.
The interrogators appeared well versed in Western political theory and bandied about the names of specialists such as Crane Brinton and Theda Skocpol who have expounded on revolution.
In June 1995, as part of Operation Combat Track, the Air Force installed a fixed interrogator inside one of their cargo aircraft and used it to read the tags on the cargo and report the content and pallet information to the destination airport.
Interrogator said it would take four days to break someone doing an interrogation in cycles of sixteen hours with lights and music on and four hours off.
The EEDSK can read tags on equipment as they pass through or are within 300 feet of its interrogators.
If the attack is to take place within minutes, coercive or painful methods ought to be useless: The captive will tell the interrogators a fake story--possibly pre-planned in the event of capture--and by the time they realize they've been duped the bomb will have gone off.
Senator McCain is talking about prohibiting American military and intelligence interrogators from doing what they did repeatedly to prisoners at Guantanamo Bay: menacing them with snarling dogs, threatening to torture their mothers, and degradations such as leading them around on leashes, stripping them naked in front of women or holding them down while a female interrogator straddles them and whispers, "We've killed your comrades.
A FEW OF THE key methods an interrogator uses to gain a confession is to help the suspect rationalize the behavior, project blame onto someone or something else, or minimize the severity or importance of the crime.
The RF tags are low-power radio transmitters attached to equipment pallets and containers, and contain up to 128 kb of information on supply level detail which is read by interrogator devices set-up near the entrances to bases and supply hubs.
Because the shock effect of capture is greatest at the moment of capture, the infantry unit that conducted the operation had been accompanied by an interrogator from its local interrogation facility to assist in the initial detainee questioning.