interview

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interview

a method of collecting social data at the INDIVIDUAL LEVEL. This face-to-face method ensures a higher RESPONSE RATE than POSTAL QUESTIONNAIRES, but can introduce INTERVIEWER BIAS by the effect different interviewers have on the quality VALIDITY and RELIABILITY of the data so collected.

Interviews may be structured, with the interviewer asking set questions and the respondents’ replies being immediately categorized. This format allows ease of analysis and less possibility of interviewer bias, but the data will not be as ‘rich’ as that elicited by an unstructured design (and may be subject to problems such as MEASUREMENT BY FIAT – see also CICOUREL). Unstructured interviews are desirable when the initial exploration of an area is being made, and hypotheses for further investigation being generated, or when the depth of the data required is more important than ease of analysis. See QUALITATIVE RESEARCH and QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES.

References in periodicals archive ?
As for Korean, South African and Canadian interviewees, they all agreed that it is a waste of time to line up just to get a simple snack like ice cream or popcorn.
The introduction of a "background-blind recruitment system" led to the adoption of "structured interviews," where interviewees are asked pre-determined questions and are evaluated through a specific method and standard in order to ensure the validity and reliability of each interview.
Interviewees from the law enforcement and intelligence sector pointed to the need for political accountability (Interviewee 4, Sec) and thus political review (Interviewee 5, Sec).
Specifically, Interviewee F considered business law to be "absolutely fundamental because everything accountants do springs, in the main, from statute" and Interviewee G remarked that "a lot of what accounting students will do is shaped by the law".
As a result, the interviewee may be unprepared to answer specific questions, or may provide incomplete or inaccurate information.
The first interviewees were identified through desk research (Gil, 2002) and the others through statements made in the interviews, which we brought to an end once they became repetitive (Baldin & Munhoz, 2011).
Second, interviewees described an important communal dimension, centered on trust, which affected their writing and their sense of belonging in both the graduate student and larger academic communities.
Likewise, larger companies engage in management training programs to prepare local residents for higher positions (Interview, Interviewee R, 5 October 2012; MSS Recruitment, 2010).
Another female interviewee pointed out that while her gender is different than many of her administrative colleagues at her transit agency, her age, ethnicity, and political ontology set her apart as well: