intransitive

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Related to intransitively: intransitive verb, ethnographic

transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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intransitive

Logic Maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third
References in periodicals archive ?
Since K acts intransitively on [PHI], the problem is reduced to l instances of the intransitive case of finding C(K [y.
Until recently the verb 'to theorize' was most commonly used intransitively.
If the novel registers intransitively, seems like Kohler's tunnel to be built for no purpose, then, by the end of the novel the reader would certainly have gravitated to the Party of Disappointed People.
Insofar as there is a standard usage, it is as a transitive verb, but Faulkner employs it intransitively, thereby eliding the verb's object and thus the event or action being interrupted.
These suggest the springtime of Ashbery with its bedazzlement, stars, mountains while the use of a transitive verb ("discovers") intransitively suggests a kind of otherworldliness.
She can speak in the passive voice or intransitively of the general emergence of broad epistemes, e.
terms be read intransitively rather than referentially: that is, a
Although Komiakov does not offer any evidence to support his claim that drincan when used intransitively means 'to become drunk', when the verb is used in an absolute sense, that is, with its object implied but not stated, it often has the specialized meaning 'to drink alcoholic beverages'.
Intransitively speaking, I theorize `about' something in the sense that I `think about' or reflect upon it, the consequence of which (if all goes to plan) being `an explanatory generalization inductively arrived at'.
Indeed in the lengthy entry on this verb, Liddell and Scott give no instance of its being used intransitively.
Then, he varies the predictable opium and surprises us with the rhyme on fascinates, used intransitively.