Intrigue


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Intrigue

 

in literature, a complicated and intense interweaving of events as a method of structuring the action or plot in novels (mostly in adventure novels) and in drama. It develops out of the sharp clash between the main characters’ interests and their purposeful, often secret struggle. An example is the intrigue over the letter about the guardianship in F. M. Dostoevsky’s novel A Raw Youth. The peripeteia involving the letter also reveals the “tragedy of the underground” and the “ethical duality” of the protagonists.

Intrigue

See also Conspiracy.
Borgias
15th-century family who stopped at nothing to gain power. [Ital. Hist.: Plumb, 59]
Ems dispatch
Bismarck’s purposely provocative memo on Spanish succession; sparked Franco-Prussian war (1870). [Ger. Hist.: NCE, 866]
Machiavelli, Nicolò
(1469–1527) author of book extolling political cunning. [Ital. Hist.: The Prince]
Mannon, Lavinia
undoes adulterous mother by brainwashing brother. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra]
Mission Impossible
team of investigators with Byzantine modus operandi. [TV: “Mission Impossible” in Terrace, II, 100–101]
Paolino
has cohort woo his covertly wed wife. [Ital. Opera: Cimarosa, The Secret Marriage, Westerman, 63]
Phormio
slick lawyer finagles on behalf of two men. [Rom. Lit.: Phormio]
Ruritania
imaginary pre-WWI kingdom, rife with political machinations. [Br. Lit.: Prisoner of Zenda]
X Y Z Affair
thinly disguised extortion aroused anti-French feelings (1797–1798). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 564]
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether it is the simple deed of spreading intrigues against a person, or the more serious act of implicating someone in a crime that he has not committed, incriminatory machinations blemish an individual's character and may eventually ruin a person's life," she added.
Clarke is the author of the historical romance series, “A Family Saga in Bear Lake, Idaho,” and the new mystery series, “The Adventures of John and Julia Evans,” which includes Anasazi Intrigue, Mayan Intrigue, Montezuma Intrigue, and Desert Intrigue.
However, for those who prefer information to intrigue, the new line actually means: For the love of cars.
The characters in Hitchcock's thrillers may have been naive innocents who stumbled into foreign intrigues, and America in the early 1940s may have been a relatively minor player in geopolitics and the global economy.
The complex plots and subplots of comedies of intrigue are often based on ridiculous and contrived situations with large doses of farcical humor.
Though it's doubtful they'll ever understand why their relatives in the industry chuckle and laugh out loud as another character is caught in his own web of intrigue and dispatched with cruel efficiency.
When the current pope (who's just been visited by a prostitute with a Fatima-like vision) dies, a set of intrigues and counter-intrigues are set in motion.
For instance, Patterson quotes Alexander Hamilton's arguments in The Federalist that presidents would not be chosen on their "talents for low intrigue, and the little arts of popularity.
Joined by his ex-Navy SEAL sidekick, Sam Duncan, Moore finds his assignment taking a dramatic change as he is lured into a spider web of intrigue.
95) receives veteran Dick Hill's usual smooth and smoky rendition as it tells of sexual intrigue and murder.
In a nutshell: Intelligent, terrific-looking and often moving adaptation of John le Carre's novel about corporate intrigue in modern Africa.
Add drama and intrigue to speeches using the tools of The Elements of Great Speechmaking: Adding Drama & Intrigue, unique in its approach of encouraging readers to innnovatively infuse speeches with drama and intrigue to make them memorable and lively.