Intrigue

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Intrigue

 

in literature, a complicated and intense interweaving of events as a method of structuring the action or plot in novels (mostly in adventure novels) and in drama. It develops out of the sharp clash between the main characters’ interests and their purposeful, often secret struggle. An example is the intrigue over the letter about the guardianship in F. M. Dostoevsky’s novel A Raw Youth. The peripeteia involving the letter also reveals the “tragedy of the underground” and the “ethical duality” of the protagonists.

Intrigue

See also Conspiracy.
Borgias
15th-century family who stopped at nothing to gain power. [Ital. Hist.: Plumb, 59]
Ems dispatch
Bismarck’s purposely provocative memo on Spanish succession; sparked Franco-Prussian war (1870). [Ger. Hist.: NCE, 866]
Machiavelli, Nicolò
(1469–1527) author of book extolling political cunning. [Ital. Hist.: The Prince]
Mannon, Lavinia
undoes adulterous mother by brainwashing brother. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra]
Mission Impossible
team of investigators with Byzantine modus operandi. [TV: “Mission Impossible” in Terrace, II, 100–101]
Paolino
has cohort woo his covertly wed wife. [Ital. Opera: Cimarosa, The Secret Marriage, Westerman, 63]
Phormio
slick lawyer finagles on behalf of two men. [Rom. Lit.: Phormio]
Ruritania
imaginary pre-WWI kingdom, rife with political machinations. [Br. Lit.: Prisoner of Zenda]
X Y Z Affair
thinly disguised extortion aroused anti-French feelings (1797–1798). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 564]
References in periodicals archive ?
In this scheme, one in which Iago is not Desdemona's but Othello's opposite, the intriguer is a much more dangerous agent to the world of the audience than in the morality-model.
He said of Willie Allison: "As an intriguer behind the scenes at Ibrox, he was as dangerous as he was despicable.
Marlowe adds to the canon some unnecessary embroideries, having Columbus educated by a prostitute called |The Amazon' in the Renaissance palace of Rodrigo Cardinal Borgia; and being responsible for the fall of the last Moorish stronghold in Granada as an agent of Ferdinand and Isabella's Secret Service -- not to mention the intriguer Amerigo Vespucci, the introduction of cigars and syphilis to Europe, the Grand Inquisitor Torquemada, pirates and alchemists, Irish monks and Icelandic saga-tellers, and the haunting Jewish beauty, Petenera, whose organisation Blue Pimpernel saved people from the Inquisition.
Alexander Hamilton is portrayed as a vicious intriguer, and possibly a grasping would-be American Caesar.
Cecil, like other recent students of Wilhelmian Germany, refrains from speculating whether the Daily Telegraph affair was a trap set for Wilhelm by that inveterate intriguer, Bulow (who had recently got rid of Holstein, Tschirschky, and Eulenburg) which eventually closed on himself.
Lih draws a penultimate conclusion from his study of the letters, to wit, that Stalin was not solely the cynical and "adept intriguer," portrayed by his defeated rivals, without principle other than the establishment and maintenance of his own power.
his friends Lord Esher and Lord Duncannon suggested - the first a congenital intriguer, and by this time everybody's unofficial representative to everybody else in Paris; the second Wilson's one-time Aide-de-Camp (A.
It is little wonder Desfieux was denounced as an intriguer and a scoundrel for he had made a revolutionary carcer on calumny.
Also, Haig was probably more of a supporter of the tank in 1916 and 1917 than "Wully" Robertson or that consummate intriguer, Henry Wilson.
Washington and Jefferson alike viewed the Whigs and Tories as little more than gangs of intriguers whose sole interest was grasping the Crown and its baubles for themselves and their friends.
Allegory is linked to "absolute vices, as exemplified by tyrants and intriguers," figures that mark "the triumph of subjectivity and the onset of an arbitrary rule over things" (2009, 233).