intrinsic factor


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to intrinsic factor: extrinsic factor, pernicious anemia, Intrinsic pathway

intrinsic factor

[in′trin·sik ¦fak·tər]
(biochemistry)
A substance, produced by the stomach, which combines with the extrinsic factor (vitamin B12) in food to yield an antianemic principle; lack of the intrinsic factor is believed to be a cause of pernicious anemia. Also known as Castle's intrinsic factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
12] it will be absorbed from the terminal ileum without the intrinsic factor.
12] to intrinsic factor and, thereby, prevent the uptake of vitamin [B.
Recombinant human intrinsic factor expressed in plants is suitable for use in measurement of vitamin [B.
Two types of intrinsic factor antibodies are known to exist:
Stage 2 is like stage 1 except that intrinsic factor is given with the labeled vitamin [B.
These factors for biocompatibility are dependent on few intrinsic factors (protein molecules) which decide the fate of cells on these nanomaterials or 3D scaffolds.
Almost half of the dental assistants chose one of the two intrinsic factors as being the main reason for working as a dental assistant.
However, intrinsic factors, such as the equity to asset ratios, are also supportive of high MDB ratings.
The degree of preservation depends both on extrinsic factors (the character of the terrain and type of burial) and intrinsic factors (the character of the bone).
We believe that students in the UK who have adopted an inactive way of life may be influenced by intrinsic factors, such as those mentioned within the article, to a greater extent than proposed.
According to it, women put more emphasis on intrinsic factors at work such as the work environment and derive more pleasure from it, while men rather focus on extrinsic factors such as their salary.
Food is generally looked at as carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and intrinsic factors.

Full browser ?