introit


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introit

RC Church Church of England a short prayer said or sung as the celebrant is entering the sanctuary to celebrate Mass or Holy Communion
References in periodicals archive ?
In a quick reading before the Mass, I noticed that it had, in the prayer following the Confiteor, "Et plebs tea laetabitur in te" (obviously, "tua" was intended); and in the Introit, "et omnis mansuetudinus eius"--obviously should have been "mansuetudinis"--and in Peter's epistle "Galatic" instead of "Galatiae" and "varlis" instead of "variis.
26-37, with three exceptions), or the introit group (Nos.
Are they final statements that exude confidence or are they an introit to more searching questions?
Her own input to this festival is huge, including among other things the Samuel Barber Concerto, Finzi's Introit, Vaughan Williams' The Lark Ascending, and a new piece from Roxanna Panufnik, Spring for violin and orchestra.
The Introit - Nimrod from Elgar's Enigma Variations - made for a powerful opening, while Diana's favourite hymn I Vow To Thee My Country was the proud, rejoicing finale, followed swiftly by the blessing and then, finally, the national anthem.
From the Introit or entrance antiphon to the closing prayer and dismissal, Howard discusses the background and meaning of each segment of the Mass.
Moreover, the composer has chosen as a cantus firmus the first fou r words and the first fourteen notes of the Introit of the Mass of the Dedication of a Church, Terr bills est locus iste, which he disposes in quasi-canonic fashion in the two lower voices in two groups of seven notes.
After this sweeping introit, the next three of the remaining six essays are surprisingly tangential and in some respects disappointing.
The justification for this reading is found in Josquin's use of the introit Gaudeamus omnes in Domino as the cantus firmus, coupled with the exposition of numerous `hidden' codes which apparently permeate the structure of the Mass.
Gunilla Iversen explores the relationship between symbolic interpretations of the opening portions of the Mass liturgy - introit, Kyrie and Gloria - and the content of the tropes associated with them.
In the service of EBM we are enjoined to begin with the introit of the question and to proceed to the anthem of the overview, the offertory of the meta-analysis, the communion of the clinical trial and the hosanna of the faithful.
Although the parts of these masses do not appear in sequence in the narrative, many of them can still be identified within various episodes: the Introit at the beginning of "Telemachus," the Kyrie Eleison in "Aeolus," the Epistle in Deasy's letter in "Nestor," the Lavabo when Bloom bathes in "Lotos-Eaters," and so on.