Introjection

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introjection

[′in·trə′jek·shən]
(psychology)
The symbolic absorption into and toward oneself of concepts and feelings generated toward another person or object; motivates irrational behavior toward oneself.

Introjection

 

in theory of knowledge, the concept, introduced by the Austrian philosopher R. Avenarius, of the inadmissibility—from his point of view—of the insertion of perceived images into the consciousness of the individual. According to Avenarius, this follows from the inadmissibility of dividing the ideal and the real in general; this view is the result of his basing his philosophy on the concept of experience, dissolving within it the contrast between the spiritual and the material and thus attempting to refute materialism entirely. Criticism of these concepts of experience and introjection is provided by V. I. Lenin in his Materialism and Empiriocriticism (Poln. sobr. soch., 5th ed., vol. 18).

In psychology introjection is the individual’s inclusion of other persons’ views, motivations, and purposes in his inner world. It is a basis for identification. Projection is the opposite of introjection. The concept of introjection was introduced by the Hungarian psychoanalyst S. Ferenczi into depth psychology, where it is viewed as a psychological mechanism that plays an important role in the formation of the superego, conscience, and other personality phenomena.

References in periodicals archive ?
And the child then proactively seeks out another non-self presence to neutralize the unwelcome introjects from the abuser: a bodyguard from the circus.
One may discover shame or fear or rage or grief that were early introjects from a shame-filled, fearful, raging, or broken-hearted parent; indeed, "I am not that.
Sometimes fully assimilating the negative introject causes overwhelm, and individuals "split off" the more toxic (suffocating, intrusive) aspects of the introjected object (e.
Normal development of ego begins with introjects of the caregivers, followed by identification with that state.
An example of an ego state built around parental introjects would be: "a child takes into himself the introject of a cruel parent.
As well, the more deeply embedded is the introject in the individual's entire fabric of self.
The introject is conceptualized to be a relatively stable personality structure which "mirrors treatment received at the hands of significant others, includes self-appraisals, verbal and motor behaviors directed at the self, and cultivation of various images of the self" (Henry et al.
Self-representations of incest survivors at their worst (their negative introject of father-abusers) were complementarily related to their perceptions of their fathers at their worst with a high degree of shame.
Another way to state the objective of therapy is to become aware of what is and is not truly yours, to consciously reject what doesn't fit, and to selectively effect introject dispersion (or assimilation) to reduce intrapsychic conflict (Kutash & Wolf, 1991; Simon, 1996).
Patient and therapist introject, interpersonal process, and differential psychotherapy outcome.
An objective of therapy can be to become aware of what is not truly yours, to consciously reject what doesn't fit, and to selectively effect introject dispersion (or assimilation) to reduce intrapsychic conflict (Kutash & Wolf, 1991; Simon, 1996).