invariance principle

invariance principle

[in′ver·ē·əns ‚prin·sə·pəl]
(physics)
Any principle which states that a physical quantity or physical law possesses invariance under certain transformations. Also known as symmetry law; symmetry principle.
(relativity)
In general relativity, the principle that the laws of motion are the same in all frames of reference, whether accelerated or not.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another was the extension of the invariance principle to accelerating observers: the laws of nature themselves should be identical for all observers, regardless of the magnitude or direction of their acceleration.
Thus, the invariance principle holds in Regime D because revenue sharing has no effect on the distribution of talent and thus does not affect pre-shared club revenues.
In section 2 we develop a formal public choice model of voter behavior and preferences for sports team subsidies, which leads to the location invariance principle.
In the cognitive blending model, the invariance principle, constraining the integration network against image-schematic clash in its required inputs and outcomes, apparently specifies at least one mandatory aspect or element of blending: image-schemata.
In [2] one shows that non-relativistic quantum mechanics for a free particle emerges from classical mechanics via an invariance principle under transformations that preserve the Heisenberg inequality.
Recently, Szymanski (2007) proposed an extension of Hirshleifer's CSF that gives rise to the invariance principle.
Anyway, a sample of the ideas that sometimes keep me awake: According to Galileo's Invariance Principle, it's possible to sit still while moving, as in a vehicle or on a horse, except that it isn't, as we unhappily discover should vehicle or horse suddenly stop.
To the knowledge of the author, experimental tests of special relativity, however, are not based on the invariance principle but on the coordinate transformations where the proper time of a moving system is computed by integrating the equation
The specific application to MLB of this invariance principle is credited to Rottenberg (1956) and it is representative of the principles of the Coase (1960) theorem.
k] is an interaction field, then it should result from the gauge invariance principle [5].
Our results are thus consistent with the invariance principle, and suggest that the assumptions behind those models that conclude that redistribution will affect league balance either positively or negatively do not hold.
The main fundamental mathematical tools to be developed in this endeavour are a discrete analogue to the theory of regularity structures, as well as a number of nonlinear invariance principles.