false light

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false light

[¦fȯls ′līt]
(navigation)
A light which is unavoidably exhibited by an aid to navigation and which is not intended to be a part of the proper characteristic of the light, such as reflections from storm panes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most obvious theory is invasion of privacy, although this is not always easy to prove to a judge or jury.
New York, Nov 1 (ANI): The lawyer for an Indian origin student in New Jersey university who has been charged with invasion of privacy for secretly filming gay-sex footage of roommate Tyler Clementi, has claimed that he and his co-accused student were the only ones to have seen the footage for a few seconds and had never transmitted it anyone else.
About 46 percent of the public sees direct mail offers as a nuisance and 9 percent sees them as an invasion of privacy.
The FaceSnap/FaceCheck system makes other inspections, which may be considered an invasion of privacy, virtually unnecessary.
Every party they threw, every letter they wrote, and every phone call they made were subject to observation and analysis by dozens of agents--undercover or otherwise They may have been free from the threat of physical harm, but they were not at all free from harassment and invasion of privacy.
Last June, an appellate court upheld the dismissal of the Winters' claims of defamation, invasion of privacy, and misappropriation of names and like-nesses.
This invasion of privacy and manipulation of guilt has been experienced by former members worldwide.
In the absence of any court action, it explained, such a letter is an invasion of privacy.
The court held that the Due Process Clause did not afford a remedy under [section] 1983 for the alleged invasion of privacy of a county jail inmate who was placed in a cell that did not have a privacy partition next to the toilet.
For both students and teachers, says Moses Hanson-Harding, 13, of Pierrepont School in Rutherford, New Jersey, cameras are "a complete invasion of privacy.
The state constitution does not provide a cause of action for invasion of privacy, and federal law does no t apply without widespread discriminatory "custom and usage" by the local government.