Invective

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Invective

 

a harsh denunciation or satirical mockery of a real individual or group of individuals, usually accompanied by some displacement in the reality of the portrayal. Invective is characterized by a two-dimensional quality of structure and meaning, which often emphasizes personal accusations for the purpose of public denigration.

The literary forms of invective are varied and include epigrams (by Martial) and polemical articles and speeches (Cicero’s Philippics). Invective was employed by Aristophanes in the comedies Knights and Clouds, by Catullus in his lyrics, by Erasmus in Praise of Folly, and by Diderot in Rameau’s Nephew. The term “invective” is rarely used.

References in classic literature ?
Corney muttered a variety of invectives against old women who couldn't even die without purposely annoying their betters; and, muffling herself in a thick shawl which she hastily caught up, briefly requested Mr.
Philip burst into one of his invectives against 'The Creation' the other day," said Lucy, seating herself at the piano.
to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective.
The boy, patterning his conduct after that of his preceptor, unstoppered the vials of his invective upon the head of the enemy, until in realization of the futility of words as weapons he bethought himself of something heavier to hurl.
Lady Bertram listened without much interest to this sort of invective.
I was in a great hurry to depart, but of course I sat down, pulled out a copy of L'Opinion Nationale, and fell to reading an extraordinary piece of invective against Russia which it happened to contain.
What was meant by the invective against him who had no music in his soul?
The opening was a sound piece of slashing invective about the evil secrets of princes, and despair in the high places of the earth.
Strickland employed not the rapier of sarcasm but the bludgeon of invective.
He had the choler of the obese, easily roused and as easily calmed, and his boys soon discovered that there was much kindliness beneath the invective with which he constantly assailed them.
Whereupon he turned and left the captain with the same indifferent ease that was habitual with him, and which was more surely calculated to raise the ire of a man of Billings' class than a torrent of invective.
But the idea of this dried-up pedant, this elaborator of small explanations about as important as the surplus stock of false antiquities kept in a vendor's back chamber, having first got this adorable young creature to marry him, and then passing his honeymoon away from her, groping after his mouldy futilities (Will was given to hyperbole)-- this sudden picture stirred him with a sort of comic disgust: he was divided between the impulse to laugh aloud and the equally unseasonable impulse to burst into scornful invective.