inverse condemnation


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inverse condemnation

A legal doctrine holding that, in certain circumstances, where private property is destroyed or substantially diminished in value by government action, the conduct of the government is regarded as the taking of the property and the owner of the property must be compensated in fair value by the government.
References in periodicals archive ?
Absent unusually strong facts, inverse condemnation is rarely a viable claim and can result in significant expense and delay to the client.
The district court dismissed the claim for inverse condemnation against Washington and Oregon for lack of jurisdiction and dismissed the parallel declaratory judgment action against the Gorge Commission for lack of subject matter jurisdiction.
3d DCA 1983), the Third DCA affirmed the trial court's denial of an inverse condemnation action predicated on alleged condemnation blight arising from a parcel's inclusion in a dedicated redevelopment area.
Rick has a comprehensive perspective on eminent domain and inverse condemnation," said Bob Hamilton, managing partner of Allen Matkins' Orange County office.
Shortly after the court denied Barton's attempt to amend his pleadings in the eminent domain proceeding, Barton pursued an inverse condemnation action against the City concerning his remaining property.
And, several South Pasadena residents, including some members of PAMRC, affected by the noise and vibration of the Gold Line have filed a class action for inverse condemnation arising from the Gold Line's alleged effect on their properties.
In the first place, just because a regulation has a negative effect on value does not mean it constitutes an inverse condemnation.
Suit seeks $1,100,000 in damages; inverse condemnation.
His eminent domain and inverse condemnation work ranges from representing the TCAs in eminent domain matters, allowing for construction of the Orange County toll roads, to his recent successful work for a small handicapped church, the Calvary Deaf Church, against a state transportation department.
Use of half of property owner's front yard as public roadway without compensation constitutes inverse condemnation
Plaintiffs seek unspecified damages for inverse condemnation.
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