inverse-square law


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inverse-square law

[′in‚vərs ¦skwer ‚lȯ]
(physics)
Any law in which a physical quantity varies with distance from a source inversely as the square of that distance.

inverse-square law

inverse-square law
A law which applies to a light source (or to a sound source) that is in a space far away from any reflecting surface: the intensity at a point, as measured on a surface which is perpendicular to a line drawn between the point and the source, varies inversely with the square of the distance between the point and the source. (For sound waves, this decrease in intensity is equivalent to a drop in sound-pressure level of 6 dB for each doubling of distance from the source.)
References in periodicals archive ?
That option isn't feasible because Earth's orbit obeys the inverse-square law.
Taylor had proposed an idea that the inverse-square law of gravitation may be explained based on the concept of source or sink [65].
Consequently, the practicable version for Rindler's Lorentz force law becomes the same as a time-retarded version for Newton's well-known inverse-square law
For example, the observed behavior of the Earth revolving around the sun can be perfectly explained if the sun has a net positive charge and the planets have a net negative charge, since opposite charges attract and the force is an inverse-square law, exactly like the increasingly discredited theory of gravity.