ionization cross section

ionization cross section

[‚ī·ə·nə′zā·shən ′krȯs ¦sek·shən]
(physics)
The cross section for a particle or photon to undergo a collision with an atom, thus removing or adding one or more electrons to the atom.
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To calculate the intensity of x-ray emission in electron beam microanalysis requires a knowledge of the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionizations events producing x rays of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector.
The intensity of x rays emitted when an electron beam strikes a sample depends on the energy distribution of the electrons in the solid, the energy variation of the ionization cross section of the relevant subshell, the fraction of ionization events that give x rays in the line of interest and the absorption coefficient of the x rays on the path to the detector.
x](E) is the ionization cross section for the relevant subshell, [f.
In microanalysis the ionization cross section for production of x rays and the electron energy distribution are often multiplied together to form a new function [PHI]([rho]z), that is a function of depth in spatially homogeneous specimens (1).
The direct measurement of only the doubly charged ions-processes (5), (7), and (8)-tends to produce small cross sections compared to the total ionization cross section because of the high probability for the rapid break-up of the doubly charged ions as shown in Ref.
The Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model for electron-impact total ionization cross sections has been applied to [CH.
The Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model (1) has successfully generated reliable total ionization cross sections of small as well as large molecules (2-6).
This modification was found not only to be effective but also absolutely necessary to have the theory agree with reliable experimental ionization cross sections near the threshold for many neutral atoms and molecules.
A time-dependent close-coupling method is used to calculate antiproton-impact single ionization, ionization with excitation, and double ionization cross sections for H$_2$ between 5.
This scaling is similar to a scaling for ionization cross sections used earlier by Burgess [3], who shifted the incident energy T by B + U, where U is the kinetic energy of the target electron.
The book includes extensive Appendices with supporting information on gas flow modeling, ionization cross sections and reaction rates, electron energy transfer and thermalization, etc.
This scaling is similar to a scaling for ionization cross sections used earlier by Burgess (2), who shifted the incident energy T by B+U, where U is the kinetic energy of the target electron.