ipecac


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

ipecac

(ĭp`ĭkăk), drug obtained from the dried roots of a creeping shrub, Cephaelis (or Psychotria) ipecacuanha, native to Brazil but cultivated in other tropical climates. There are three varieties of the root, brown, red, and gray, varying according to the age of the plant, its place of growth, or the method of drying. Emetine, the active principle of ipecac, is obtained from the bark of the root. It is a powerful poison that produces vomiting and is sometimes prescribed to relieve the stomach of some other poison. Ipecac is used as an expectorant in the treatment of bronchitis or croup, stimulating bronchial secretions to make coughing easier. Brazilian Native Americans used ipecac for centuries to treat amebic infections. Its use became more widespread in the 17th cent., and the pure substance emetine is still used in the treatment of amebic dysentery and amebic hepatitis, as well as some parasitic infestations. Ipecac must be used with great caution and only under medical supervision.

ipecac

[′ip·ə‚kak]
(botany)
Any of several low, perennial, tropical South American shrubs or half shrubs in the genus Cephaelis of the family Rubiaceae; the dried rhizome and root, containing emetine, cephaeline, and other alkaloids, is used as an emetic and expectorant.

ipecacuanha

, ipecac
1. a low-growing South American rubiaceous shrub, Cephaelis ipecacuanha
2. a drug prepared from the dried roots of this plant, used as a purgative and emetic
References in periodicals archive ?
Death from ipecac intoxication in a patient with anorexia nervosa.
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) no longer recommends that parents keep ipecac on hand to treat poisonings.
In another example, the author advocates that syrup of ipecac "should be part of all household medicine cabinets".
First, a laxative of rhubarb or calomel or an emetic, ipecac, to be followed up with a mixture of rust of iron, powdered columbo root, and orange peel twice a day for four weeks.
The author records an 1822 practitioner's recommendation for treating sick headache: First, a laxative of rhubarb or calomel or an emetic, ipecac, to be followed up with a mixture of rust of iron, powdered columbo root, and orange peel twice a day for four weeks.
5 m in height, include Asclepias purpurascens (purple milkweed), Phryma leptostachya (lopseed), Porteranthus stipulatus (American ipecac or Indian physic), Ruellia strepens (wild petunia), Smilacina racemosa (false Solomon's seal), and Verbesina helianthoides (yellow crownbeard).
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued guidelines at its annual meeting asking its membership to urge parents to stop using syrup of ipecac for poison control.
The recommended use of the client-completed assessment questionnaire is questionable as it could inadvertently result in some clients using further disordered behaviours due to the inclusion of questions such as 'do you use ipecac to induce vomiting?
If a child is blue and rigid during coughing bouts, with symptoms of breathlessness, wheezing and chest feeling weighed down, during nausea (but has a clean tongue) then administer ipecac 6c.
A Food and Drug Administration Advisory Panel voted 6-4 that ipecac syrup, used for years as an emergency in-home method of gastrointestinal decontamination, should no longer be available over the counter.
To feign illness, perpetrators go to great lengths, such as suffocating to mimic apnea, tainting urine with blood, poisoning to resemble gastric complications, inducing vomiting with ipecac to look like reflux problems, and producing unexplainable rashes with chemical irritants.
These behaviors included not having a working fire extinguisher, not being aware of safety hazards in other homes where their children played, not knowing about syrup of ipecac, leaving children alone in the car, and seating children in the front of a car.