ipecac


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ipecac

(ĭp`ĭkăk), drug obtained from the dried roots of a creeping shrub, Cephaelis (or Psychotria) ipecacuanha, native to Brazil but cultivated in other tropical climates. There are three varieties of the root, brown, red, and gray, varying according to the age of the plant, its place of growth, or the method of drying. Emetine, the active principle of ipecac, is obtained from the bark of the root. It is a powerful poison that produces vomiting and is sometimes prescribed to relieve the stomach of some other poison. Ipecac is used as an expectorant in the treatment of bronchitis or croup, stimulating bronchial secretions to make coughing easier. Brazilian Native Americans used ipecac for centuries to treat amebic infections. Its use became more widespread in the 17th cent., and the pure substance emetine is still used in the treatment of amebic dysentery and amebic hepatitis, as well as some parasitic infestations. Ipecac must be used with great caution and only under medical supervision.

ipecac

[′ip·ə‚kak]
(botany)
Any of several low, perennial, tropical South American shrubs or half shrubs in the genus Cephaelis of the family Rubiaceae; the dried rhizome and root, containing emetine, cephaeline, and other alkaloids, is used as an emetic and expectorant.

ipecacuanha

, ipecac
1. a low-growing South American rubiaceous shrub, Cephaelis ipecacuanha
2. a drug prepared from the dried roots of this plant, used as a purgative and emetic
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, ipecac shouldn't be given to children under 6 months of age.
The problem is, from the point of view of poison control, vomiting is not equal to efficacy Induction of vomiting with ipecac is useless if the patient presents several hours after ingestion; 2 or 3 hours is plenty of time for poisons or drugs to be digested and assimilated.
Kornberg and Dolgin (1991) performed a prospective randomized study that examined the use of syrup of ipecac before activated charcoal in one group of pediatric ingestions, versus the use of activated charcoal alone.
Panel members voting to take ipecac off store shelves were swayed by its well-defined toxic effects, the lack of data on its effectiveness, and the potential for abuse by people with eating disorders.
Richard Dart of the poison center in Colorado says it is important to have either ipecac or charcoal in your home.
Released on Ipecac Recordings, the label founded by former Faith No More vocalist Mike Patton, "Hostile Ambient Takeover" highlights the band's many faces.
Medicines: Iodine, bleach, eye wash, Benadryl, aspirin, Tylenol, syrup of ipecac, activated charcoal, baking soda, cough syrup, Pepto-Bismol, petroleum jelly.
Is it better to use syrup of ipecac or activated charcoal in cases of accidental poisonings?
I used ipecac, the emetic kept in first-aid kits that causes a reeling, sweaty nausea that made me wish I were dead.
A study of over 55,000 cases of children under 6-years-old who swallowed a drug found that over 90% of the cases could be managed at home if there was syrup of ipecac in the home.
Over 50% of the providers said they had syrup of ipecac on hand, but only half of them could locate the bottle and read the label to the interviewer.
Keep syrup of ipecac on hand, in case your physician or poison control center instructs you to give it to your child to induce her to vomit and clear her stomach.