irreducible element

irreducible element

[‚ir·ə′düs·ə·bəl ′el·ə·mənt]
(mathematics)
An element x of a ring which is not a unit and such that every divisor of x is improper.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first chapter, entitled "Definitions and Locations," pinpoints "magic" as the irreducible element coexisting with people's everyday activities in the natural world.
The relation between Jews and Christians includes an irreducible element of dispute and even rivalry.
One more example (introducing the idea of contradictions): 'The contradictory is an irreducible element of human life as we all experience it.
Faris's criteria are: the presence of an irreducible element of magic; the presence of the phenomenal world; unsettling doubts in the reader to explain the nature of the events; the merging in the narrative of different realms; disruptions of time, space and identity.
I personally would have preferred that Brower had made his own position on these matters explicit--especially since history, rather like psychical research, depends on good faith and contains an irreducible element of indeterminacy.
To Dawson, Shakespeare's fictional creations are of course constructed fictionalized characters on display for our pleasure, but they also embody an irreducible element of personhood that links them to theological concepts of a mediated eucharistic presence.
V] be the poset of join- irreducible elements of the weight poset [Q.
the inculturation of baptism, through which its meaning, the irreducible elements of the baptism rite, is expressed through the means particular to each culture; and
These were the irreducible elements of mind and, because they were separate, the possibility of harmonizing them was almost nil, or at least required considerable time and effort.
Like Oppen, Clark looks into the natural world for the irreducible elements of our existence, and finds there a ground to test the credulities and prejudices that limit our ability to see the thing before our eyes.
In elucidating the subtitle, he finds the "myths" of the Renaissance are irreducible elements that lead to the constant redefinition of the "concept" of the Renaissance, and then examines the quest for truth in the Renaissance through an analysis of Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and Giordano Bruno.