Pulpitis

(redirected from irreversible pulpitis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

Pulpitis

 

an inflammation of the dental pulp caused by an infection usually resulting from advanced dental caries. Pulpitis may also be caused by a trauma (for example, fracture of a tooth crown near the pulp) or chemical irritation (acids, formaldehyde). Pulpitis generally develops as an acute process. The principal symptom is sharp intermittent pain that frequently irradiates along the branches of the trigeminal nerve; the pain may simulate disease of the adjacent teeth. When left untreated, pulpitis results in periodontitis.

Treatment involves the complete or partial removal of the pulp after it is devitalized or anesthetized. Pulpitis can sometimes be cured and the pulp preserved if the patient visits a dentist promptly. The final stage of treatment is filling the tooth.

References in periodicals archive ?
A prospective, randomized single-blind evaluation of effect of injection speed on anesthetic efficacy of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.
Preoperative oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block in irreversible pulpitis treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials.
Effect of preoperative ibuprofen on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Comparison of anesthetic efficacy of 4% lidocaine for maxillary buccal infiltration in patients with irreversible pulpitis.
Aggarwal V, Jain A, Kabi D, Anesthetic efficacy of supplemental buccal and lingual infiltrations of articaine and lidocaine after an inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.