isoinertial

isoinertial

[¦ī·sō·i′nərsh·əl]
(biophysics)
Pertaining to the force of a human muscle that is applied to a constant mass in motion.
References in periodicals archive ?
IMUs, typically used for estimating body segment orientation [16], have been specifically employed for the assessment of ROM during joint mobility tests (IMU fixed on the body segment) [17-19] and muscle strength during isoinertial strength tests (IMU fixed on the external resistance) [17,20] by estimating the body segment's orientation and force impressed to the external resistance, respectively.
The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability of using a single IMU for determining strength curves during isoinertial exercises.
2006) Moderate relationship between isoinertial muscle strength and ballistic movement performance.
Kankaanpaa M, Taimela S, Webber C, Airaksinen O, Hanninen O (1997) Lumbar paraspinal muscle fatiguability in repetitive isoinertial loading: EMG spectiral indices, Borg scale, and endurance time.
Isoinertial and isometric tests use simpler equipment and software.
isoinertial test--measures the lifting of progressively heavier weights at a set frequency over a specific vertical range
That study reported non-significant increases (7-10%) in isometric cervical strength (measured in extension and left lateral flexion) after an 8-week isoinertial cervical resistance training program conducted 2-3 times per week.
2007) determined muscle performance from strength values obtained from various types of isometric or isoinertial tests which bear little resemblance to golf actions.
Therefore, dynamic actions in isoinertial conditions (constant gravitational load) together with adequate testing protocols would seem more appropriate to evaluate muscle strength and power for golf, where the swing is characterized by high accelerations.
The ability to develop high levels of force to accelerate or decelerate a limb or an external load of constant mass, usually defined as isoinertial strength (Abernethy and Jurimae, 1996), is a major determinant of performance in many sports.
A similar load-velocity relationship is also demonstrated in isoinertial, in vivo exercise with maximal voluntary acceleration (Cronin et al.