isotropic turbulence

isotropic turbulence

[¦ī·sə¦trä·pik ′tər·byə·ləns]
(fluid mechanics)
Turbulence whose properties, especially statistical correlations, do not depend on direction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Measured turbulence levels during this work is less than 9%, which Bruun (1995) showed that the problem of rectification is limited below the level considering homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.
RSM provides anisotropic turbulence to flows; when the hypothesis of turbulent viscosity is used, the model gives isotropic turbulence.
The closure assumptions of the k-[epsilon] model are only valid for high-intensity and nearly isotropic turbulence.
Chapters cover the motion of particles and heat exchange in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and gradient turbulent flows; collisions of particles in a turbulent flow; and dispersion, collision, and clustering of monodispersed and bidispersed particles in homogeneous turbulence.
Most eddy viscosity models assume isotropic turbulence structures, which could fail for flows with strong anisotropic behaviors, such as swirling flows and flows with strong curvatures.
Above T = 1 K, with viscosity present, it has been shown that grid turbulence is equivalent to homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a classical fluid.
Measured turbulence levels during this work were less than 35%, which Bruun (1995) showed that the problem of rectification is small below this limit, considering homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.
Pierre et Marie Curie) and Cambon (mechanics, French National Center for Scientific Research) draw upon their significant research in their examples, and consider the needs of the practitioner in their organization, starting with an explanation of the statistical analysis of homogeneous turbulent flows and moving on to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence, including pure rotation (anisotropic) strain, pure shear, buoyancy and stable stratification.