iteroparous


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iteroparous

[‚īd·ə·rə′par·əs]
(zoology)
Capable of breeding or reproducing multiple times.
References in periodicals archive ?
This discrepancy was also found in Slimy Salamander (Plethodon glutinosus) (Petranka, 1998) and may be common among other iteroparous amphibians.
Brachyuran crabs are iteroparous species which present a high diversification of reproduction patterns (Hartnoll & Gould 1988), which may have evolved as a species-specific response to environmental conditions.
Humpback whitefish and least cisco are iteroparous, although there seems to be variabi 1 ity between spawning events (Reist and Bond, 1988; Lambert and Dodson, 1990; Brown, 2006).
For that we test the following predictions drawn from territorial hypothesis: (1) female should be iteroparous, (2) females should forage and feed more than guarding males, (3) time budget dedicated to territoriality should not change from territorial to parental males, (4) egg-clutches should be easily spotted, (5) egg-clutches should be placed on rare defendable resources.
It can be concluded from the present studies that catla is an iteroparous seasonal breeder which does not spawn in captivity.
Evolutionary change in flowering phenology in the iteroparous herb Beta vulgaris ssp.
Maternal egg-guarding is a costly behavioral strategy for iteroparous arthropods because it reduces lifetime fecundity by increasing the risk of death from predation and reducing foraging opportunities for guarding females during the long periods of care (Tallamy & Brown 1999; see also Buzatto et al.
plasticity in an iteroparous plant: the interactive effects of genotype,
All species return to their natal streams to deposit eggs; most species are semelparous, spawning once before dying, though some steelhead and most cutthroat trout are iteroparous, maintaining the ability to migrate back to sea after spawning and to return to spawn again.
The base, or intrinsic, vitality loss rate is proportional to the -- 1/3 power of adult body mass across a range of iteroparous species.