Galbulidae

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Galbulidae

[‚gal′bu̇l·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The jacamars, a family of highly iridescent birds of the order Piciformes that resemble giant hummingbirds.

Galbulidae

 

(jacamars), a family of birds of the order Piciformes. The birds measure 13–39 cm in length and have long, slender bills. The legs are short, with four digits; certain representatives of the genus Jacamaralcyon have three digits. The plumage is soft, with an intense green or black sheen on the back.

The family embraces 15 species, which are distributed in the lowlands of tropical forests of Central and South America from southern Mexico to southern Brazil. They nest in burrows dug in termite nests or cliffs. There are two to four eggs per clutch. The brood period is 20 to 23 days. The young hatch covered with a thick down. The Galbulidae feed on insects, catching them in flight.

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References in periodicals archive ?
the jacamars, I discovered, are indeed a family - of birds - from South and Central America; a species characterised by a long, pointed bill (no allusions to Mrs Jaikumar here, seriously) and an iridescent green plumage.
Other notable winners: Cumbernauld (1975 Queen Alexandra Stakes), Midway Lady (1985 May Hill Stakes) Jacamar (1988 Chesham Stakes), Batshoof (1990 Tattersalls Gold Cup Stakes, Prince of Wales's Stakes), White Crown (1992 Solario Stakes), Polish Laughter (1993 Mill Reef Stakes, 1993 Railway Stakes), En Attendant (1993, 1994 Bunbury Cup), Bin Ajwaad (1994 Desmond Stakes, 1995 Gladness Stakes), Tipsy Creek (1996 Norfolk Stakes), Fahris (1997 Select Stakes), Ramooz (1997 Van Geest Criterion Stakes, 1997 and 1999 Minstrel Stakes, 1998 Boland Stakes), Alshakr (2000 Falmouth Stakes), Itnab (2003 Princess Royal Stakes)
In January 2011, OSG redelivered the Overseas Jacamar (Aframax), which had been chartered in, and the Aqua, a time-chartered Aframax in which the Company had a less than 100% ownership interest.
During the quarter the Overseas Takamar and Overseas Jacamar traded in the clean product market.
1974: Avian speciation in tropical South America, with a systematic survey of the toucans (Ramphastidae) and jacamars (Galbulidae).
Field observations and feeding experiments on the responses of rufous-tailed jacamars (Galbula ruficauda) to free-flying butterflies in a tropical rainforest.