jacaranda

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jacaranda

(jăk'ərăn`də): see bignoniabignonia
, common name for the family Bignoniaceae, a family of chiefly woody vines of the American tropics and also a few shrubs and trees. The trumpet creeper (of the genus Bignonia) and the trumpet flower, or trumpet vine (of the genus Campsis
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Jacaranda

 

the wood of certain South American plants of the genus Jacaranda of the family Bignoniaceae. The heartwood is from dark red to chocolate brown, with a violet tinge; the sapwood is light yellow. Jacaranda, a heavy, durable wood that polishes well, is used in the manufacture of expensive furniture, musical instruments, parquet, and lathe products. Sometimes the wood of other trees, including those of the genus Dalbergia of the family Papilionaceae, is called Jacaranda. The wood of the birch, maple, and alder are used to imitate Jacaranda.


Jacaranda

 

a genus of trees or shrubs of the family Bignoniaceae. The leaves are opposite and usually twice pinnate. The flowers have a tubular-umbellate or funnelform corolla and are in panicled inflorescences. The fruit is a capsule with winged seeds. There are 40 to 50 species, found in the tropics of the western hemisphere. Some species, including. I brasiliana and J. obtusifolia, are the source of valuable wood. Many species are cultivated as ornamentals in countries having warm climates.

jacaranda

[‚jak·ə′ran·də]
(materials)

jacaranda

1. any bignoniaceous tree of the tropical American genus Jacaranda, having fernlike leaves and pale purple flowers and widely cultivated in temperate areas of Australia
2. the fragrant ornamental wood of any of these trees
3. any of several related or similar trees or their wood
References in periodicals archive ?
In Westwood, look for jacarandas in the 5-acre Franklin D.
The showiest jacarandas are on the 500 to 700 blocks of Palm Drive and on Oakhurst Drive.
In the Valley, no botanical event is more delightful and defining than the hazy mauve-blue bloom of jacaranda trees, a sure sign that summer has unofficially arrived.
In addition to the jacaranda, there are many plants with blue or mauve flowers that come into their own in warm weather.
An ethereal lavender blue cloud engulfs the majestic canopy - a good 50 feet high and nearly as wide - of mature jacarandas.
A little over a month ago, I received a call from someone who wanted me to inspect his jacaranda tree.
Jacaranda seeds are among the easiest of all seeds to germinate, but you must do so when temperatures are at least in the high 70s - unless you have a temperature-controlled greenhouse or a coil to provide bottom heat.
So permit us to thank all those people out there who have planted and cared for jacarandas.
Jacaranda trees (Jacaranda mimosifolia) are in flower all over the place, dusting lawns, streets and sidewalks with their lavender blue blossoms.
Klecker said another precaution is to plant jacarandas far from walkways, as he did at his house.
Stunning splashes of purple have begun dotting the Southern California landscape as exotic jacaranda trees reach full bloom and shower streets with delicate flowers.
But then, this morning, I woke from a dream about Africa, which reminded me that one plan I fashioned on my travels was to get myself a jacaranda tree.