Jealousy

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Jealousy

See also Envy.
Jesters (See CLOWNS.)
adder’s tongue
flower symbolizes jealousy. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 31]
Anastasia and Orizella
Cinderella’s two step-sisters; jealous of her beauty, they treat her miserably. [Fr. Fairy Tale: Cinderella]
Arnolphe
representative of jealous middle age. [Fr. Lit.: L’Ecole des Femmes]
Bartolo, Dr.
jealous and suspicious tutor. [Fr. Lit.: Barber of Seville]
Calchas
dies from grief on encountering even wiser soothsayer. [Gk. Myth.: LLEI, I: 325]
Callirrhoë
demands of husband former wife’s necklace and robe. [Gk. Legend: NCE, 55]
Cephalus and Procris
young married couple plagued by jealousy. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 62]
coat of many colors
Jacob’s gift to Joseph; object of jealousy. [O.T.: Genesis 37:3]
Deianira
kills husband Hercules for suspected affair with Iole. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 303]
Dionyza
jealously plots Marina’s murder. [Br. Lit.: Pericles]
Donald Duck
frustrated character jealous of Mickey Mouse. [Comics: Horn, 216–217]
Ferrando
of Manrico’s influence on Leonora. [Ital. Opera: Verdi, The Troubadour, Westerman, 302]
Golaud
jealousy leads to the murder of his brother, Pelléas. [Fr. Opera: Debussy, Pelléas and Mélisande, Westerman, 196]
green-eyed monster
epithet. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Kitelys
man and wife each laughably suspicious of the other’s fidelity. [Br. Lit.: Every Man in His Humour]
Leontes
of wife and Polixenes. [Br. Lit.: The Winter’s Tale]
Malbecco
seeing his wife living among satyrs, he is so mad with jealosy that he casts himself from a cliff. [Br. Lit.: Spenser The Faerie Queene; Brewer Dictionary, 336]
Medea
sends husband Jason’s new bride poisoned cloak. [Gk. Lit.: Medea; Fr. Lit.: Médée]
Oberon
King of Fairies; jealous of wife’s attachments. [Br. Lit.: A Midsummer Night’s Dream]
Othello
smothers Desdemona out of jealousy. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Polyphemus
crushes lover’s lover. [Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
Pozdnishef, Vasyla
murders wife in fit of insane resentment. [Russ. Lit.: The Kreutzer Sonata, Magill I, 481–483]
Shabata, Frank
mistrusted everyone who showed kindness to wife, Marie. [Am. Lit.: 0 Pioneers!, Magill I, 663–665]
wild ass
signifies jealousy. [Animal Symbolism: Jobes, 142]
yellow
color symbolizing jealousy. [Western Folklore: Jobes, 1704]
yellow rose
indicates jealousy. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 177]

Jealousy

(dreams)
Experiencing jealousy in your daily life may cause you to dream about it. If you are not aware of your jealousy, your unconscious may be giving you some hints of awareness. Jealousy is usually a result of insecurity. Consider this dream a learning experience. Analyze some of your feelings of insecurity or inadequacy and then begin to deal with those issues.
References in classic literature ?
You deserve it for being jealous of me," said Agatha.
Certain visitors may be received, certain preferences shown, which expose young women to remark, and which are enough to drive out of their senses even those husbands who are least disposed to be jealous.
You're jealous of me, William; but you're not in love with me.
It threatened the vengeance which knows no fear, no pity, no remorse--the vengeance of a jealous woman.
While the captain was taking all opportunities to press these and such like arguments, to remove the little foundling from Mr Allworthy's, of whose fondness for him he began to be jealous, Mrs Deborah had made a discovery, which, in its event, threatened at least to prove more fatal to poor Tommy than all the reasonings of the captain.
Oh, her husband was a sad wicked man, and of course it was of me that the poor dear was jealous.
Emmy, he remembered, was at one time cruelly and deservedly jealous of Rebecca, never mentioned her name but with a shrinking and terror--a jealous woman never forgives, thought Dobbin: and so the pair went across the street to Mrs.
Yes, yes," she said, evidently trying to suppress her jealous thoughts.
John dear, you never can be jealous of Mr Lightwood?
But all these sayings and doings and thinkings being unknown to Mr Swiveller, affected him not in the least; he was debating in his mind how he could best turn jealous, and wishing that Sophy were for that occasion only far less pretty than she was, or that she were her own sister, which would have served his turn as well, when the company came, and among them the market-gardener, whose name was Cheggs.
Here Miss Jane (previously instructed for the purpose) interposed her many curls and whispered her sister to observe how jealous Mr Cheggs was.
He still sees her occasionally as part of their group of friends - they meet up a couple of times a year - but we've never all been away together and I'm worried about feeling awkward or jealous.