jeopardy

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jeopardy,

in law, condition of a person charged with a crime and thus in danger of punishment. At common lawcommon law,
system of law that prevails in England and in countries colonized by England. The name is derived from the medieval theory that the law administered by the king's courts represented the common custom of the realm, as opposed to the custom of local jurisdiction that
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 a defendant could be exposed to jeopardy for the same offense only once; exposing a person twice is known as double jeopardy. Double jeopardy is prohibited in federal and state courts by the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The concept refers to an offense, not to an act giving rise to an offense; therefore, it is possible to try a person for multiple violations arising from a single act (e.g., assault, attempted murder, and carrying a deadly weapon). Jeopardy does not exist until the juryjury,
body convened to make decisions of fact in legal proceedings. Development of the Modern Jury

Historians do not agree on the origin of the English jury.
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 is sworn in, or, if there is no jury, until evidence is introduced. The prohibition of double jeopardy does not preclude a second trial if the first court lacked jurisdiction (authority), if there was error in the proceedings, or if the jury could not reach a verdict. A similar principle, known as res judicata, operates in civil suits. It holds that once a civil case has been finally decided on the merits the same parties can not litigate it again. In England and Wales, revisions to criminal law that took effect in 2005 now permit the Court of Appeal to order a person acquitted of a crime to be retried if there is "new and compelling" evidence.

jeopardy

Law danger of being convicted and punished for a criminal offence
References in periodicals archive ?
a member of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, issued the following statement after President Trump announced his decision to impose up to 30 percent tariffs on imported solar panels and modules that will jeopardize tens of thousands of American solar jobs:
troops would withdraw next year, which will lead to grave consequences for other aid donations that could jeopardize Afghanistan's fragile recovery from war.
MUZAFFARABAD -- Opposition leader in the National Assembly Syed Khursheed Shah said Indian forces violations at the Line of Control would jeopardize the peace of the entire region.
Summary: "We reject any attempts that would jeopardize the security in the Kurdistan Region," the statement.
Experts say Google likely will not move further into travel as doing so could jeopardize other areas of its business.
Such an "energy crunch" within the next five year could jeopardize any hope of a recovery from the present global economic recession, Birol told the British daily The Independent.
Brock wrote that he exercised "editorial restraint" because "advance reporting on the project could jeopardize one of the largest white-collar job announcements in state history.
Any PR company would have to follow suit not to jeopardize business or profits.
Murph said he hadn't known a political contribution could jeopardize the church's tax-exempt status until Parks' campaign returned the check.
This election provides an alternative mechanical method, under which the charity's lobbying activities will not jeopardize its tax-exempt status as long as its expenditures do not exceed certain limits.
The Supreme Court sided with the government, ruling that, in a time of "vigorous preparation for national defense," the judicial branch "should not jeopardize the security which the [secrets] privilege is meant to protect by insisting upon an examination of the evidence.
The failure to delineate the different parts of the exchange with counsel may jeopardize privilege protection for the entire exchange.