jettison

(redirected from jettisoning)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

jettison

(jĕt`əsən, –zən) [O.Fr.,=throwing], in maritime law, casting all or part of a ship's cargo overboard to lighten the vessel or to meet some danger, such as fire. Such cargo, when found later, is known as jetsam (see flotsam, jetsam, and liganflotsam, jetsam, and ligan
[O.Fr.], in maritime law, goods lost at sea as distinguished from goods washed ashore (wreck). Goods that remain floating on the surface after a shipwreck or accident are called flotsam (or floatsam or flotsan), while jetsam refers to goods thrown
..... Click the link for more information.
). The master of the ship has the absolute right to jettison cargo when he reasonably believes it to be necessary, and the owners of the ship incur no liability. If the vessel carries goods of more than one shipper, the rule of general average provides for apportioning the loss among all the shippers because all have benefited by the master's action. On the other hand, if some cargo is lost by accident, the shippers who suffered no loss do not contribute to indemnification.

jettison

[′jed·ə·sən]
(engineering)
The throwing overboard of objects, especially to lighten a craft in distress.

jettison

i. To cast or discard fuel or any external store from an aircraft in flight.
ii. The selective release of armament stores from an aircraft other than in a normal attack. This may be done to lighten the aircraft in an emergency or to get rid of a hung-up store.
References in periodicals archive ?
They harness the dynamism found in some of the artist's strongest past work while jettisoning much of the cuteness that sometimes hindered the weakest.
Employers that do not have strong unions like Ford does have been jettisoning health insurance or reducing coverage and benefits.
Even as they coped with Bryant's legal troubles, team officials scrambled to reassemble the roster, jettisoning longtime veterans and fan favorites Robert Horry, Brian Shaw and Mark Madsen.
The sails have split and the sailors are furiously jettisoning their cargo, unaware that salvation is miraculously at hand.
Rushing toward a supernova death, the star (not shown) had expanded enormously, jettisoning its outer layers at some 32,000 kilometers per hour.