Jointer

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jointer

[′jȯint·ər]
(engineering)
Any tool used to prepare, make, or simulate joints, such as a plane for smoothing wood surfaces prior to joining them, or a hand tool for inscribing grooves in fresh cement.
A file for making sawteeth the same height.
An attachment to a plow that covers discarded material.
A worker who makes joints, particularly a construction worker who cuts stone to proper fit.
A pipe of random length made from two joined, relatively short lengths.

Jointer

 

(also, jointer planer), a woodworking machine for straight planing (milling and jointing) of workpieces along faces or edges. Jointers have a frame on which are mounted a circular knife shaft (usually with from two to four blades), a table, a vertical cutterhead, a guide (fence), and a removable or fixed feed mechanism; the last component is absent when manual feed is used. Usually, one large face and one edge are worked simultaneously. The workpiece is oriented along the fence when the vertical cutter head is removed. When a large face and an edge are worked simultaneously, the knife shaft and the vertical milling head are both used, with the latter set at an angle of 90° to the table’s surface. The table consists of a long front section, set at a height corresponding to the thickness of the layer being planed off, and a fixed rear section, whose surface is level with the height of the periphery of the cutting edges of the blades.

Jointers may be combined with thickness planers in a single machine designed for the two-sided planing of beam-shaped parts and sheets. Such combination machines have a box-shaped frame with a feeding device, four base tables, two jointing heads, and two planing heads mounted on the upper part; a blower and a drive for the feed mechanism are located inside the frame. Work-pieces are held in a magazine having transverse supports situated between two feed chains. The machines can process up to 30 workpieces simultaneously.

REFERENCE

Derevoobrabatyvaiushchee oborudovanie: Katalog-spravochnik. Moscow, 1972.

N. K. IAKUNIN

jointer

1. A metal tool used to cut a joint partly through fresh concrete.
2. In masonry, a tool for filling the cracks between courses of bricks or stones.
3. In masonry, a bent strip of iron inserted into a wall to strengthen a joint.
4. In carpentry, a long plane, esp. used to square the edges of boards or veneer so that they will make a close joint with other pieces.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oliver Machinery says its 5240 25-inch jointer planer features a digital thicknessing control, quick-set thickness gauge, variable feed speed and easy-access to the two helical cutterheads.
Type: There are two choices: traditional or older-type jointers that need to be assembled on the machine and cassette jointers that can be preassembled and then mounted on the machine.
The programme was set up after employers said there was a national shortage of cable jointers.
Energy and Utility Skills, the skills council for the utility industry, set up the programme after hearing from employers that there was a shortage of cable jointers nationally.
For top quality, look for jointers that feature a head with three or four knives.
Along with the table saw, the jointer is the essential wood tailoring tool.
These establishments generally use woodworking machinery, such as jointers, planers, lathes, and routers to shape wood.
A total of 9271 steel fixers, 9431 painters, 87298 labourers, 12939 technicians, 5209 mechanics and 336 cable jointers, 33655 drivers and 3643 operators also proceeded to abroad for employment.
Bradley said products in the directory include bandsaws, miter saws, lathes, jointers, planers, shapers, routers & bits, power drills, cordless tools, mortisers, table saws, dust collectors, circular saw as well shop essentials such as glues, paint, stains and other finishes as well as utility knives & blades, vises, workbenches, measuring tapes, clamps and other supplies.
However, it was less likely that larger companies using moulders, for instance, also used shapers or jointers at a similar relative rate as smaller companies.
Formwork jointers make shuttering for concrete structures.