Journal

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journal

1. an official record of the proceedings of a legislative body
2. the part of a shaft or axle in contact with or enclosed by a bearing
3. a plain cylindrical bearing to support a shaft or axle

Journal

 

in a number of bourgeois states, an obligatory document in which a businessman (physical or juristic person) daily sets down the transactions of his business. The information in the journals reflects the business’s financial position.


Journal

 

the portion of a shaft or axle that is supported by a bearing. End and end face journals are known as pivots, and journals located in the middle of a shaft are called necks. End and neck journals may be cylindrical, conical, or in some cases spherical; end face journals may consist of an annulus with a single bearing surface or sometimes a collar with several surfaces. Conical journals permit the clearance to be adjusted in a sliding bearing, and spherical journals allow substantial angular deflections of the shaft relative to the bearing. If a journal is supported by a sliding bearing or if the journal’s surface is directly in contact with the rolling bodies of a ball or roller bearing, the surface of the journal must be very hard and have few irregularities if good wear resistance is to be achieved. Deviations from specification in the shape and dimensions of a journal have a major effect on the operation of the mechanism, and journals are consequently manufactured to a high degree of precision.

journal

[′jərn·əl]
(mechanical engineering)
That part of a shaft or crank which is supported by and turns in a bearing.
References in classic literature ?
Most of us hearers were in shadow, for the candles in the smoking-room had not been lighted, and only the face of the Journalist and the legs of the Silent Man from the knees downward were illuminated.
The disconsolate journalist had seated himself at a writing-table.
At the opera he talked with journalists, for he stood high in their favor; a perpetual exchange of little services went on between them; he poured into their ears his misleading news and swallowed theirs; he prevented them from attacking this or that minister on such or such a matter, on the plea that it would cause real pain to their wives or their mistresses.
Defoe was a journalist first, though by nature ever a story-teller.
Crook shall be clown; he's a journalist and knows all the oldest jokes.
Monsieur de Marquet, with a nervous gesture, caressed his beard into a point, and explained to Rouletabille, in a few words, that he was too modest an author to desire that the veil of his pseudonym should be publicly raised, and that he hoped the enthusiasm of the journalist for the dramatist's work would not lead him to tell the public that Monsieur "Castigat Ridendo" and the examining magistrate of Corbeil were one and the same person.
She was in love with all the new princes and princesses who married into the imperial family; she had been in love with a high dignitary of the Church, a vicar, and a parish priest; she had been in love with a journalist, three Slavophiles, with Komissarov, with a minister, a doctor, an English missionary and Karenin.
I don't think he was aware that the story of the midnight arrest had been ferreted out by an English journalist and given to the world.
Never at any time have I been able to bear the flunkeyishness which one meets in the Press of the world at large, but more especially in that of Russia, where, almost every evening, journalists write on two subjects in particular namely, on the splendour and luxury of the casinos to be found in the Rhenish towns, and on the heaps of gold which are daily to be seen lying on their tables.
Instead of men endowed with divine authority and directly guided by the will of God, modern history has given us either heroes endowed with extraordinary, superhuman capacities, or simply men of very various kinds, from monarchs to journalists, who lead the masses.
Six or seven years later we met again, when we had both become journalists, and had both had poems accepted by Mr.
And the journalists, stung to the quick, retaliated with the only means in their power-printer's ink abuse.

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