kiloton


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kiloton

1. one thousand tons
2. an explosive power, esp of a nuclear weapon, equal to the power of 1000 tons of TNT

kiloton

[′kil·ə‚tən]
(physics)
A unit used in specifying the yield of a fission or fusion bomb, equal to the explosive power of 1000 metric tons of trinitrotoluene (TNT). Abbreviated kt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under normal circumstances, a yield of 1 kiloton (kt) creates seismic waves approximately equal to a magnitude 4.
46 million tons in the same period of 2009; and it will continue the rapid growth in 2011 owing to the fact that over 700 kilotons of viscose fiber will be put into production in China.
and Soviet governmens pledged in the 1970s to honor a testing limit of 150 kilotons, the two have yet to officially ratify any treaty that limits the threshold of nuclear weapons testing.
45 kilotons in 2009, approximating 65% market share, followed by Americas Cytec of about 17.
Kidder of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at a Department of Energy-sponsored workshop on cavity decoupling, the military significance of tests near 10 and 150 kilotons has been far greater than that for tests below 1 kiloton under the Threshold Test Ban Treaty.
Each warhead has the explosive power of 100 kilotons and Britain's Trident subs can pop off eight in one go.
4 kilotons, which is the equivalent of the power from 6,400 tons of dynamite blowing up.
TOKYO, Sept 6 (KUNA) -- Japan on Wednesday revised its estimate of North Korea's sixth nuclear test, saying that the recorded 160 kilotons explosion was ten times stronger than the Hiroshima bomb.
South Korea's weather agency estimated the nuclear blast yield of the presumed test was between 50 and 60 kilotons, or five to six times stronger than North Korea's fifth test in September 2016.
The blast's explosive yield was estimated at 120 kilotons of TNT based on the seismic magnitude, NORSAR said, compared to 15 kilotons for the Hiroshima bomb.
Nations like China, the United States, and the European Union-28 rank way up in carbon dioxide emissions, each producing millions of kilotons of CO2 per year.
And while Rosatom mines less than 4 kilotons of uranium from domestic deposits, the Russian industry needs 16 kilotons.