komatik

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komatik

a sledge having wooden runners and crossbars bound with rawhide, used by the Inuit and other related peoples
References in periodicals archive ?
During the course of surveys of raised beaches on Victoria Island (inhabited by Copper Inuit during the historic period) we recorded several relict komatiks.
However, we found no grave goods or human remains in association with the komatiks.
The slats in this and the other komatiks are tapered on each end to about 1/3 to 1/2 of the maximum width.
Otherwise, construction was of the simplest possible form: the runners were simply tapered upward at the front ends, without any further upward extensions, as seen in more elaborate komatiks and toboggans.
Its condition was very similar to that of the Wollaston Peninsula komatiks (highly weathered, scattered), and associated artifacts indicated a probable prehistoric Neoeskimo affiliation, but no sample was taken for dating purposes.
And no other direct radiocarbon dates are reported on komatiks in Arctic Canada in the Canadian Archaeological Radiocarbon Database (to 2005), indicating presumably that complete or nearly complete archaeological Neoeskimo komatiks are generally rare, if not unique.
Nevertheless, it is also significant that all of the komatiks found on southwestern Victoria date to Thule and prehistoric Copper Eskimo time.
The five komatiks in archaeological context reported here from the Wollaston Peninsula, southwest Victoria Island, dated from 790-300 BP, are clearly prehistoric Neoeskimo in affiliation, and are the first nearly complete prehistoric komatik "assemblage kits" to be reported in the Canadian Arctic.
81 m, indicating that these komatiks are smaller than most historic Inuit sleds.
Radiocarbon dates on Neoeskimo komatiks, southwestern Victoria Island.
Given that locally available driftwood is fairly abundant, all of the komatik wood may have been derived from that source.
The komatik dates are also within the range of dates on caribou and muskox bones from Neoeskimo sites in the region (Le Mouel and Le Mouel, 2002; Savelle et al.