lacquer


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Related to lacquer: Japanese Lacquer

lacquer,

solution of film-forming materials, natural or synthetic, usually applied as an ornamental or protective coating. Quick-drying synthetic lacquers are used to coat automobiles, furniture, textiles, paper, and metalware. The lacquer formula may be varied to impart durability, hardness, gloss, or imperviousness to water. Nitrocellulose (pyroxylin) lacquers are the most widely employed. Slower-drying natural lacquers contain oleoresins obtained from the juice of trees, especially of Rhus vernicifera, a sumac of SE Asia. Lacquer work was one of the earliest industrial arts of Asia. It was highly developed in India; the Chinese inlaid lacquer work with ivory, jade, coral, or abalone and were unrivaled in making articles carved from it. The art spread to Korea, then to Japan, where it took new forms, notably gold lacquer work. Fine Asian ware may have more than 40 coats, each being dried and smoothed with a whetstone before application of the next. The ware may be decorated in color, gold, or silver and enhanced by modeled reliefs, engraving, or carving. Buddhist monasteries encouraged the art and now preserve some of the oldest pieces extant; in the temple of Horyu-ji, near Nara, Japan, is a Chinese-made sword scabbard of the 8th cent. Notable lacquer artists include Ogata KorinOgata Korin
, 1658–1716, Japanese decorator and painter. He is renowned for his lacquer work and paintings on screens, decorated with bold designs and striking color contrasts, and his masterful compositional use of empty space.
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 (17th cent.) and Shibata Yeshin (19th cent.). In the 17th cent., Western European imitations were popularized as japanningjapanning
, method of varnishing a surface, such as wood, metal, or glass, to obtain a durable, lustrous finish. The term is derived from a process popular in England, France, the Netherlands, and Spain in the 17th cent.
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 and carried to great perfection in France in the vernis Martin developed by the Martin brothers under Louis XV. Commercial production of lacquer work in the 19th cent. resulted in a decline in quality.

Bibliography

See Lacquer: An International History and Illustrated Survey (1984).

lacquer

[′lak·ər]
(materials)
A material which contains a substantial quantity of a cellulose derivative, most commonly nitrocellulose but sometimes a cellulose ester, such as cellulose acetate or cellulose butyrate, or a cellulose ether such as ethyl cellulose; used to give a glossy finish, especially on brass and other bright metals.

Chinese lacquer, Japanese lacquer, lacquer

A hard-wearing varnish drawn from natural sources, as from the Japanese varnish tree.

lacquer

Any glossy enamel which dries quickly by evaporation of the volatile solvents and diluents. Also see Chinese lacquer.

lacquer

1. a hard glossy coating made by dissolving cellulose derivatives or natural resins in a volatile solvent
2. a black resinous substance, obtained from certain trees, used to give a hard glossy finish to wooden furniture
3. lacquer tree an E Asian anacardiaceous tree, Rhus verniciflua, whose stem yields a toxic exudation from which black lacquer is obtained
4. Art decorative objects coated with such lacquer, often inlaid
References in periodicals archive ?
It involved preparing and adding later after layer of thin coatings of lacquer to a wooden base, each of which needed to dry before it could be polished so the next one could be applied.
Small carved objects such as bowls, plaques and even jewellery made from cinnabar lacquer are among the most common objects you'll find.
5 With handgilded rods set in a white lacquer wooden frame, the Monterey sofa from Badgley Mischka brings a luxurious yet minimal touch to the living room.
It is a testament to Canepa's dedication to the subject, and clarity of her organisation, that she has not only provided in-depth discussion and discovered new information regarding East-West trade in silk, porcelain and lacquer in the 16th and early 17th centuries, but has presented it in such a way as to make it accessible.
Although the physical mechanisms of lacquer formation involving particles and hydrocarbons in the exhaust were investigated, few studies have investigated the chemical mechanism [11].
Morgan Taylor Lacquer Nail Polish in Sitting Pretty, $9, loxabeauty.
For GBK's 2015 Primetime Emmys Gift Lounge, Ellison's Organics will gift celebrities the shade Peace Sand Quiet, a nude creme lacquer that is trending on catwalks and complements many fall and winter fashion looks.
The pale-gold lacquers for either aluminum or steel beverage cans are the result of a comprehensive development process, extensive testing, pack-testing and industrial scale-up trials.
After the clocks went forward last night we're well and truly in the mood for spring and this Dior nail lacquer is the perfect colour to match with your transitional wardrobe.
DECORATIVE goods made from the sap of the lacquer tree have been put on display at the Bahrain National Museum.
uk) | Black lacquer accessories, PS36 to PS76, Balineum (www.