lady


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lady

History a woman with proprietary rights and authority, as over a manor

Lady

1. (in Britain) a title of honour borne by various classes of women of the peerage
2. Our Lady a title of the Virgin Mary

LADY

(language)
["Key Concepts in the INCAS Multicomputer Project", J. Nehmer et al IEEE Trans Soft Eng SE-13(8):913-923 (Aug 1987)].
References in classic literature ?
It is not customary in England, Miss Worsley, for a young lady to speak with such enthusiasm of any person of the opposite sex.
Enter LADY HUNSTANTON, followed by Footman with shawls and a cushion.
My Lady Steyne," he said, "once more will you have the goodness to go to the desk and write that card for your dinner on Friday?
My Lord, I will not be present at it," Lady Gaunt said; "I will go home.
Sir Leicester is twenty years, full measure, older than my Lady.
To the mistress of the house, and to all who inhabit it or enter it, she is known as Grace Roseberry, the orphan relative by marriage of Lady Janet Roy.
The hurry in which Jones had been all day engaged on account of his poor landlady and her family, the terrors occasioned by Mrs Honour, and the confusion into which he was thrown by the sudden arrival of Lady Bellaston, had altogether driven former thoughts out of his head; so that it never once occurred to his memory to act the part of a sick man; which, indeed, neither the gaiety of his dress, nor the freshness of his countenance, would have at all supported.
Miss Pink, trembling between terror and indignation, acknowledged Lady Lydiard's polite inquiry by a ceremonious bow, and an answer which administered by implication a dignified reproof.
Pickwick, grasping the old lady's hand, and speaking so loud that the exertion imparted a crimson hue to his benevolent countenance--'I assure you, ma'am, that nothing delights me more than to see a lady of your time of life heading so fine a family, and looking so young and well.
It was an awkward coincidence that the bell of the Old South was just then tolling for a funeral; so that, instead of a gladsome peal with which it was customary to announce the arrival of distinguished strangers, Lady Eleanore Rochcliffe was ushered by a doleful clang, as if calamity had come embodied in her beautiful person.
Delamayn interfered once more, in the interests, this time, of the lady of the house.
My lady," says Sir John, "I can't do without him, either.