lag

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lag

[lag]
(civil engineering)
A flat piece of material, usually wood, used to wedge timber or steel supports against the ground and to make secure the space between supports.
(electronics)
A persistence of the electric charge image in a camera tube for a small number of frames.
(physics)
The difference in time between two events or values considered together.

LAG

On drawings, abbr. for lagging.

lag

lagclick for a larger image
i. A delay or time interval in an instrument like the vertical speed indicator (VSI) or an altimeter between the actual event and its display. An altimeter lags in steep descent and very steep climbs, while some lag is inherent on all VSIs.
ii. The angular crankshaft movement between a reference position such as TDC (top dead center), BDC (bottom dead center), and the opening or closure of a valve. Also called valve lag.
iii. The angular movement between the helicopter hub and the temporary slower blade.
iv. The delay in the human reaction to an event.

lag

References in periodicals archive ?
In summary, while CFO exhibits lags and asymmetry that increase over time, much less of CFO than earnings is explained by lags and asymmetry.
2015) instead of the single-day lags of 3 or 5 days used in the primary models.
Specifically, the dependent variable is the estimated coefficient on lagged positive equity market returns from regressions of CDS returns on lags of itself, lagged positive equity market returns, and lagged negative equity market returns.
Given the permanent importance of lags in effect of monetary policy the issue seems to be quite neglected with few significant exceptions.
The results of the VAR model with 4 lags are presented at Table 6.
Equation (3) is the no-defection condition whereas Equation (4) requires that each firm does not deviate from the punishment path after deviation is detected in the game with l detection lags.
At short lags, the representation of the second target undergoes continuous decay resulting from the combined delays induced by the switch and first-target processing.
This means we would have to estimate n x m = 4 x 20 = 80 parameters in the third term alone to forecast a monthly variable using four monthly lags of daily data.
Still, the downside of the RMR index is that it still lags behind the NAREIT index by about 3 years.