lament

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lament

a poem or song in which a death is lamented
References in periodicals archive ?
The "vocabulary" of lament motifs of various peoples is rife with prayers, threats, promises, and flattering--all aiming (or having been aimed, in cases where the more modern lamenter no longer "remembers" it) at gaining control over the comings and goings of the dead.
Thus, a very practical magical combat between the here and the afterworld goes on in laments, a combat in which the lamenter is a kind of gatekeeper and medium.
The words gore-goryushka (sorrow) often encountered in the Russian lament vocabulary mark, for the people surrounding the lamenter, an initiatory experience and a greater openness for him/her of the borders between this and the other world, signifying his or her changed status not only for the period of mourning, but for the whole life (Adon'eva 2004, 227 ff.
The abovementioned Onega Vepsian lamenter also made wind-raising sweeping movements over the grave; upon arriving on the grave, she also pronounced the formula, "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" (Welcome, daddy, Jesus has risen, all the deceased have come), as though thereby carrying yet again out the cosmogonic waking act, the specific function of which was to begin communication with the deceased in a customary manner (Vinogradov & Lozanova 1941, 109; also Honko 1974, 29 f.
The occasional lament spoke primarily about the lamenter herself and her husband, neither of whom had quite successfully made the passage from the liminal phase of the ritual: one in the role of the orphan, the other in that of the deceased.
The lamenter being usually the person closest to the deceased one, has figured as an onlooker of the events, posing questions and commenting on things.
The repertoires of contemporary funerary laments, collected and recorded during my field work in Luxor, reveal the fact that many lamenters compare death to earthquakes and natural cataclysms, including cosmic events and other spontaneous acts of nature which trigger destruction and misfortune.
To the women lamenters, "the house"--in symbolic terms--invokes the sense of clan or extended family, and the continuity of life across generations.
Funerary laments have always been performed, as the lamenters Balabil and cAliya sang: "For our destinies and our fates.
Lamenters draw upon a stock of images and metaphors, coined by the most prolific members of the profession, to embody and mourn the deceased.
Lamenters are also challenged to reexamine their most basic convictions about who God is and how God works in the world, and about the need to confront situations of crisis and conflict, frustration and failure.
Lamenting that is a work of the Spirit fosters compassion, whereby lamenters become "kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ has forgiven you" (Eph 4:32).