land ice


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land ice

[′land ‚īs]
(hydrology)
Any part of the earth's seasonal or perennial ice cover which has formed over land as the result, principally, of the freezing of precipitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both of these rivers of ice have rapidly increased the rates in which they drain land ice to the ocean in the past years.
It seems that at the moment the sea ice is growing (with no sea level impact, as Richard explains) but the land ice is shrinking, and thus contributing to rising sea levels.
Scambos says there isn't enough land ice on the Antarctic Peninsula to raise sea level appreciably.
Water World Satellite data indicate that more than 2 trillion tons of land ice in Greenland, Alaska, and Antarctica have melted since 2003, in what scientists say is a clear sign of global warming.
Main Concept: Global warming is melting land ice and sea ice in the Arctic Circle, and on Antarctica.
In recent years, evidence has mounted that global warming may be accelerating the melting of land ice and sea ice in the Arctic.
Dr Church pointed out that the 2000 IPCC Third Assessment Report had concluded that it was very likely that the 20th century's warming has contributed significantly to the observed sea-level rise through thermal expansion of sea water and widespread loss of land ice.
Now that's down to 10 per cent - but if all the land ice melted, the sea level would rise by 70 metres worldwide.
The rise is due to thermal expansion of the warming ocean and due to the melting of land ice in the form of glaciers and ice sheets.
SUGAR LAND, Texas -- The Gold Medal won in Vancouver by the 2010 USA Paralympic sled hockey team was "in the house" at the Sugar Land Ice and Sports center, as were current and former gold medal winners Taylor Lipsett, Lonnie Hannah and Sled Hockey All-Stars from Dallas and San Antonio.
ARISE researchers will fly survey missions that target different cloud types and surface conditions, such as open water, land ice and sea ice.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- While 99 percent of Earth's land ice is locked up in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, the remaining ice in the world's glaciers contributed just as much to sea rise as the two ice sheets combined from 2003 to 2009, said a new study led by Clark University and involving the University Colorado Boulder.