land ice


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land ice

[′land ‚īs]
(hydrology)
Any part of the earth's seasonal or perennial ice cover which has formed over land as the result, principally, of the freezing of precipitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dilution of salt in the Antarctic by freshwater land ice results in increased sea ice, because water can now freeze at higher temperatures.
It seems that at the moment the sea ice is growing (with no sea level impact, as Richard explains) but the land ice is shrinking, and thus contributing to rising sea levels.
There are a number of reasons why sea levels are rising, but the primary explanation is that warmer temperatures are melting land ice and pushing more water into the ocean.
Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Manchester Metropolitan University and the Universite catholique de Louvain modelled sea-level changes over millennial timescales under a range of different emissions scenarios, taking into account all of the Earth's land ice and the warming of the oceans.
Land ice on Earth: a beginning of a global synthesis.
With the retreat of sea ice and land ice, new, previously inaccessible areas are being revealed allowing for exploration in areas for the first time.
15) Mercer's warning seemed prescient when the Larsen ice shelf--which buttresses land ice on the Antarctic Peninsula to the north--began crumbling in 1995.
The 84 technical papers collected focus on the following issues: geoinformation and remote sensing; new sensors and instruments; image processing techniques; times series analysis and data fusion; imaging spectroscopy; urban remote sensing, land use, and land cover; radar remote sensing and laser imaging detection and ranging; land degradation and desertification; hydrology, land ice & snow, and coastal zones; forestry and agriculture; three-dimensional spatial analysis; and world heritage.
This award-winning documentary reveals many startling new scientific revelations such as penguin suicide, new vegetation growing in the world's largest desert, diminishing populations of land animals and marine life and the dangerously increasing melting of Antarctica's land ice.
Water World Satellite data indicate that more than 2 trillion tons of land ice in Greenland, Alaska, and Antarctica have melted since 2003, in what scientists say is a clear sign of global warming.
Sugar Land Ice & Sports Center, 16225 Lexington Blvd.
Main Concept: Global warming is melting land ice and sea ice in the Arctic Circle, and on Antarctica.