lapse rate


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lapse rate

[′laps ‚rāt]
(meteorology)
The rate of decrease of temperature in the atmosphere with height.
Sometimes, the rate of change of any meteorological element with height.

lapse rate

The rate of decrease of an atmospheric variable with height. However, the term normally refers to the fall of temperature with height. The three types of lapse rates referred to in meteorology are dry adiabatic lapse rate, saturated adiabatic lapse rate, and environmental lapse rate. See also dry adiabatic lapse rate, saturated adiabatic lapse rate, and environmental lapse rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, increasing (decreasing) premiums would induce higher (lower) lapse rates.
The true drivers of premium increases--or more accurately, why older blocks of long-term care insurance policies are generating such losses as cumulative premiums exceed cumulative claims--is that long-term care insurance has had "surprisingly" low lapse rates, and it has been difficult for insurance companies to generate much investment return on their premiums collected in the current interest rate environment.
Thus, as lapse rates continue to be low, and interest rates continue to be low, insurers find the pricing on their old policies to have an increasingly severe shortfall, leading companies to go back to their state insurance departments to request a premium increase to ensure the financial strength and viability of the insurer.
The lapse rate on life policies has traditionally been one of the central parameters in the managerial framework for life insurers.
Renshaw and Haberman (1986) find an additional significant interaction between policy type and duration of policy, meaning that the lapse rate depends not only on single factors but also on the combination of factors.
The lapse rate increases when the portfolio is set in a runoff position, and falls thereafter.
The affirmation of the ratings reflects Fidelity Life's strong risk-adjusted capitalization, consistent profitability as well as its improving lapse rates and experience profits.
In this example, a company currently has a jump in its post-level premiums of 10 times the level premium and currently is experiencing an 85% shock lapse rate.
We will also investigate the instance where the lapse rate is represented by a stochastic process, functionally dependent on some economic factors.
My first thought was that it could be due to variability in the lapse rate, which can vary by 2:1, but the table is way stronger than that.
The combination brings about instability meaning that the lapse rate, the degrees cooled as one ascends is of greater value than the normal 3oC per 1000 feet.