larva migrans


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Related to larva migrans: visceral larva migrans

larva migrans

[′lär·və ′mī‚granz]
(invertebrate zoology)
Fly larva, Hypoderma or Gastrophilus, that produces a creeping eruption in the dermis.
(medicine)
Infestation of the dermis by various burrowing nematode larvae, producing a creeping eruption that may become contaminated with bacteria.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As intermediate hosts, humans may develop visceral, ocular, and neural larva migrans (NLM) (1,3).
Differentiation of larva migrans caused by Baylisascaris procyonis and Toxocara species by Western blotting.
Migration of the larval forms of some helminths may cause cutaneous larva migrans or systemic features, usually including pulmonary involvement, with eosinophilia (known as visceral larva migrans).
Outbreak of cutaneous larva migrans in a group of travellers.
Descriptions of 4 cases of visceral larva migrans in immigrants from Latin America, Spain, April 1989-June 2008 * Case Age, Clinical signs and no.
These parasites are increasingly recognized as a cause of larva migrans in humans, an infection that often results in severe neurologic sequelae or death.
To the Editor: Hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans is a parasitic dermatosis caused by the penetration of larvae, mostly of a dog or cat hookworm, into the epidermis of humans (1,2).
This section also includes photographs of physical findings in travelers; the photographs highlight such diseases as African tick-bite fever, chikungunya, dengue, swimmer's itch, African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, measles, tungiasis, and cutaneous larva migrans.
Symptoms in humans occur as the larva migrates through tissues, causing cutaneous and/ or visceral larva migrans, which may begin within 24-48 hours after ingestion of infected meat.
The raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, is increasingly recognized as a cause of serious or fatal larva migrans disease in humans and animals.
Baylisascaris procyonis, the raccoon roundworm responsible for fatal larva migrans in humans, has long been thought to be absent from many regions in the southeastern United States.
migrans, ocular larva migrans, urticaria, pulmonary nodules, hepatic and