laryngospasm


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Related to laryngospasm: bronchospasm

laryngospasm

[lə′riŋ·gə‚spaz·əm]
(medicine)
Sudden and uncontrollable closure of the larynx; often seen in anaphylactic reactions.
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Inspiratory stridor with incomplete laryngospasm or no air movement with complete obstruction should be followed by prompt manoeuvres to treat the laryngospasm.
Table 2 Summary of anaesthetic problems Problem Number Intraoperative problems Difficult intubation 9 Laryngospasm 2 Bradycardia 2 Hypotension 1 Drug error 1 High spinal block 1 Postoperative problems Respiratory depression 3 Hypertension 2 Postoperative vomiting 1 Chest pain 1
Clinicians should maintain a low threshold for laryngeal endoscopy and should not assume that the patient's complaints are always related to laryngospasm and muscle tension that are commonly associated with PVFM.
No patient suffered adverse respiratory events such as laryngospasm or bronchospasm, and Sp[O.
If this still does not resolve the problem, insert a laryngeal mask airway while also excluding other causes of difficult ventilation such as laryngospasm or bronchospasm.
There were three cases of laryngospasm and one case each of bronchospasm, upper airway edema, and misplaced tube in the middle ear.
An acute syndrome of pharyngolaryngeal dysesthesia seen in 1-2% of patients characterized by subjective sensations of dysphagia or dyspnea, without any laryngospasm or bronchospasm (no stridor or wheezing) may also occur.
TABLE 5 The incidence of postoperative unexpected events and the need for fentanyl Group M, Group P, Group S, P n=35 n=31 n=35 Nausea, vomiting 0 1 0 NS Laryngospasm 0 1 1 NS Desaturation 0 0 0 NS Need for fentanyl 2 2 7 <0.
Extrapyramidal Haloperidol, Rigidity, opisthotonus, chlorpromazine laryngospasm Narcotic Morphine, heroin, CNS depression, miosis, codeine slow respiration, hypotension Withdrawal Various; alcohol, Piloerection, barbiturates, cocaine, hypertension, benzodiazepines, etc.
The number of uses continues to expand; a few of the more common indications are spasmodic dysphonia, recurrent vocal process granuloma, paroxysmal laryngospasm, and paradoxical vocal fold movement disorder.
Eventually the laryngospasm was overcome with CPAP alone and rapid return of normal saturations occurred.
Additional lidocaine (1 or 2 sprays) was applied to the vocal folds when laryngospasm occurred.