late-type stars

late-type stars

Relatively cool stars of spectral types K, M, C (carbon), and S. They were originally thought, wrongly, to be at a much later stage of stellar evolution than early-type stars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most globular clusters show a certain degree of uniformity in the evolutionary paths followed by their late-type stars.
The spectrum reveals both absorption lines from late-type stars (most notably titanium oxide, TiO) and bright HI and HeI emission lines from the hot compact companion.
Among the topics are gravitational wave foreground radiation from neutron star-dwarf binaries, the chromospheric activity of late-type stars of the different rotational periods, spectrophotometry and model atmosphere flux fitting, the light-time effect and tertiary companions in close binary stars, the age of the local interstellar bubble, and the current status and outreach activities of radio astronomy in Malaysia.
Red stars represent the late-type stars in the spectral classification system developed nearly 80 years ago at Harvard College Observatory.
Among the specific topics discussed are extreme coronal mass ejections in young low-mass stars, observations versus theory in low-mass eclipsing binaries, observations of late-type stars with the infrared spatial interferometer, the activity and rotation limit in the Hyades, and searching for ultra-cool objects at the limits of large-scale surveys.
5 solar masses or less -- the cool, late-type stars (F, G, K, and M) -- are thought to possess convection zones.
Although such ground-based data suffer from atmospheric blurring, taking them at near-infrared wavelengths optimized sensitivity to the light that would be expected from host galaxies made up mostly of late-type stars.
Marcy (University of California, Berkeley) obtained spectra of eight late-type stars with the 10-meter Keck.
Approximately half the sources in the first catalog are relatively cool, low-mass, late-type stars from which EUVE sees million-plus-degree coronal emission.